1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

please prepare your hides propperly

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by amizon_girl, Jun 21, 2007.

  1. or give the hide to your taxidermist

    2 vote(s)
    50.0%
  2. salt the hide w/ the meat still on the hide

    1 vote(s)
    25.0%
  3. send the hide to get fleshed by someone who knowes how

    1 vote(s)
    25.0%
  1. amizon_girl

    amizon_girl New Member

    11
    0
    When you are getting your hide tanned you need to prepare your hides properly after the hide is off the carcase you need to flesh or take off all of the meat fat and membrane. This is so the salt can get thru to set the hair. After you have fleshed the meat off you need to lay the hair-side down in a bed of salt then put salt on the hide side and make sure that all of the edges get salt. Then do the whole salt process again.

    Then fold the hide nice and neat then send it off to your tannery.


    p.s. If you don't do this process and when you get your hides back and they have slip spots or holes this is probably why. Please don't take this offensively I am only trying to help your product turn out better. and make it a lot easer on your tannery.
     
  2. Taking all of the membrane off at salting is not necessary, just all the meat and fat. I have never lost a hide to slip.
     

  3. This is something i have wondered about for a while, i started doing the skinning for our local taxidermists and he insited all the hides be salted even the furbearers that are just to be tanned, he kept saying the hair would pull if they werent. I have been skinning and fleshing for my grandpa who runs a fur business making hats and coats and such, and run a trapline but at a fur auction you will never see a salted skin , if you do salt it you would probably be laughed out of the building, just wondering if salt really does "set" the hair why do my stretched skins not slip. I just figured with the amount of knowledge out there i might be able to find someone who knows why
     
  4. Salt removes unwanted liquids and makes a very poor environment for bacteria
     
  5. amizon_girl

    amizon_girl New Member

    11
    0
    that_skinnen_kid when the hides are in the pickle swelling for the shaving process if the hide is not salted then the hair slips
     
  6. I dont get the pole, o well.
     
  7. I think it is the thickness of the hides. The thin hides dry out faster than a deer hide. I think if you could dry a deer hide out fast you would not need salt.
     
  8. amizon_girl

    amizon_girl New Member

    11
    0
    you have to salt to set the hair
     
  9. You don't salt forbearer's and the hair sets its called air drying
     
  10. When i send a hide to the tannery they are dried completely hard that is the way the tannery's want it I think. They don't want to store them with any moisture in it.
     
  11. Yeah and the air dried hides are junk for taxidermy. Air drying is an antiquated process for trappers to transport the skins to the fur buyers.
     
  12. I mean you dont salt furbearers for the fur buyers. I do salt hides for all my taxidermy mounts. But I have also sent many air dryed hides to the tannery and they always come back ok. So if you fleshed a furbearer the right way by turning the ears,eyes,lips and nose and air dryed it then sent it to the tannery why would it not be good enough to mount
     
  13. Which tannery do you send the air dried hides to.
     
  14. Carolina
     
  15. I sent several fox and two very greasy beavers that were air dried when I got them to Carolina and they came back fine
     
  16. amizon_girl

    amizon_girl New Member

    11
    0
    i am sorry for the confusion i am talking about bigger animals like: deer, elk, & buffalo
     
  17. amizon_girl

    amizon_girl New Member

    11
    0
    i am sorry i was talking about buffalo elk and deer sorry 4 the inconvience and missunderstanding