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Dermestids as pet food

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by bone-o, Nov 6, 2014.

  1. bone-o

    bone-o New Member

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    Has anybody used dermestids as food or treats for pets? They won't eat live tissue, right?
     
  2. akvz

    akvz New Member

    I'd rather keep the bugs for the pets after they've passed... in life, crickets make a nice snack for them and are usually raised to be more nutritionally complete/calcium supplemented for reptiles. My kitten and chickens love to chase them for a snack, too. Probably a little cheaper and easier to get than dermestids, at any rate.
     

  3. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    You could toss a few in with a lizard and see what happens. I would not do it on a regular basis as, like with mealworms, the hard shell pieces can cause intestinal issues if they get too much of it. And the beetles would certainly have more of a hard exoskeleton than mealworms. Larva would be ok. But I would rather be putting them to work.
     
  4. bone-o

    bone-o New Member

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    I don't have beetles (anymore) or any pets that eat them, I'm just asking because a guy is/was selling dermestids labelled as "pet treats" and it was featured on TheWorstThingsForSale.com last week because the author seems to under the impression that dermestids will eat your pets:

    http://theworstthingsforsale.com/2014/10/31/the-worst-pet-treats/
     
  5. akvz

    akvz New Member

    Dermistids aren't going to eat anyone's pets unless they're the same size or smaller... I'm pretty sure they mostly scavenge and eat already dead stuff primarily. There's not much risk of feeding them compared to crickets or anything, and even crickets will eat at geckos and invertebrates like tarantulas if left unattended and in need of defending themselves or if left without food:

    [​IMG]

    But that's a risk with any live feeding, including live rodents, rabbits, and birds for snakes.