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Inner ear

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Rick Slife, Nov 13, 2014.

  1. Rick Slife

    Rick Slife Member

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    I'm having a problem getting the cartilage off the inner ear without ripping it. I score it then peel it slowly with my hands, then suddenly it rips. I've tried removing the cartilage before tanning ( Krowtann), during and after and still having problem. Any suggestions to make this step a little easier ( besides being more careful)

    Thanks
     
  2. jhunter13

    jhunter13 Member

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    I spray water on it as I go and try to peel very close and slow.
     

  3. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I use a dull chisel or a screw driver would work, any way, I pry and twist and work it lose. When I prepare capes for my shop, I just cut it off above all that inner ear stuff and use McKenzie's ear liners with the inner ear moulded in. I do whole sale cape prep for a taxidermist buddy and he wants the inner ear skin left on. I curse all they way through the cartilage removal on those things.
     
  4. Rick Slife

    Rick Slife Member

    35
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    So you leave the cartilage in and use liners? That would make things a lot easier, what would the draw back be ( if any)
     
  5. I am pretty sure he meant that he removes the cartilege down to the ear canal where it is more difficult then cuts that section off at the ear canal. That's how I do it too. I use a mini set of wire cutters and a scalpel. I fold the ear and cut the cartilege width wise and lengthwise into four sections with scalpel, then using the cutters I start in the middle and work the cartilege loose to the tip of the ear. Then towards the canal. When I get the the ear canal I peel what I can and cut the rest where it is real thick. The ear liners have the detail already built in to the earliner for the ear canal. So when your ear is dry all you need to do is epoxy where the skin and liner meet and paint. Hope you have a good mental pic of what I am trying to say. That and I was assuming you were talking about deer.
     
  6. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Twinrivers is correct. Always remove the cartilage when using earliners. When I have to remove the cartilage from the ear canal and inner ear area when I do the wholesale hide prep, I use the dull chisel to pry and peel the skin from the cartilage.
     
  7. Rick Slife

    Rick Slife Member

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    Hey thanks for the info. Guess time patience and practice is what's needed.
    Thanks again
     
  8. ysb123

    ysb123 Member

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    don't know if this will help but fish skinning pliers works well for grabbing the cartilage and pulling it loose, need to be gentle. it's easier after tanning.
     
  9. fougair

    fougair New Member

    I use needle nose pliers but I will grab the cartilage and roll the pliers to give me better control
     
  10. I don't score the cartilage. I get it started at what would be the bottom of the ear where the cartilage is thinner. Once I get it started, I get both thumbs in there, thumb nail to thumb nail (it that makes sense), and just slowly work your way through the whole ear pealing it away. If you start seeing the fine inner ear hairs pulling through with the cartilage, STOP!, your about to tear a hole or rip it, just work around that area and come at that spot from a different direction. Just take your time. Hope this explanation makes sense.
     
  11. livbucks

    livbucks Well-Known Member

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    I use my thumbnail and slowly work it off. Next time wet it real good in and out with Stop-Rot when skinning it and it will peel off much nicer after tanning. If it begins to get fuzzy when removing, you know it is beginning to tear. Just ease it with a scalpel until it gets past the tear and resume with your thumbnail. Don't try to remove before tanning. That never works well.
     
  12. Jake H

    Jake H New Member

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    I've always used a bench grinder with a sandpaper pad on slowly ground it off. can do an ear in a few minutes. After tanning of course. you just try not to get it too hot!
     
  13. deadthingsmakegreatcrafts

    deadthingsmakegreatcrafts Dead things make the best crafts.

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    Utah
    I've had this problem too; from a total newbie's perspective here, this is the hardest so far.

    What will happen if you leave the cartilage in there and just mould it over a piece of something that holds the shape of the ear? I did that with some rabbit ears - I skinned as much as I could, inverted what I had, salted everything, and they seem to have held their shape well enough and everything is dry and still upright.

    (please be gentle, I'm new)
     
  14. livbucks

    livbucks Well-Known Member

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    Will not happen. They will curl up like potato chips. Look like dookie.