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Switching from earliners to bondo?

Discussion in 'Deer and Gameheads' started by 4000fps, Jun 30, 2007.

  1. 11th hour

    11th hour Member

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    With the bondo, is it possible to not add enough hardener and have them never kick? I've used it on several deer and didn't like how fast it kicked. I've been using ear magic with great results due to the working time, but more expensive.
     
  2. As long as the bondo has even the slightest tint of red in it, (or blue, depending on the brand of catalyst) it will eventually kick. It will just take longer. Just make sure you stir it enough that it is completely mixed throughout.

    I've always used earliners, but after reading all of these posts I am going to try bondo. Peeling cartilage sucks.
     

  3. i dont put resin in mine. I use a tongue depressor to put it in the ear. Its a thick paste. it starts shaping immediately.
     
  4. 11th hour

    11th hour Member

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    What is perlite?
     
  5. swampfox

    swampfox New Member

    Perlite looks like finely ground styrofoam. A little bit of it will thicken the bondo and you can feel it better when working the ear. The chopped fiberglass, or angel hair type bubba mentioned will make the mixture stronger, allowing you to get an extremely thin, strong ear. For those who have never used this method, if you have a source of capes that are just being wasted for one reason or another, gather a few up and use them for practice. As Frank mentioned, a wallpaper roller will roll those edges out nice, and thin.
     
  6. Turkey Creek

    Turkey Creek Member

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    I get in a lot of split eared deer and I can't see for the life of me how you could bondo them. That in my opinion is where an earliner really shines. Open the notch completely. Trace the part to remove, cut, and install. You could never open the splits far enough on the deer I do to get bondo all the way down inside without making holes.

    I tan all my own capes and might have 1 in 25 deer have an ear that I tear a small hole in and that is usually because I get in a hurry in removing the cartilage. I put liners in the last African pieces I did with no problems either. For those who do not use earliners on a regular basis and think you will do your competition piece with them and get great results you are kidding yourself. If you don't do something on a regular basis you might as well just stick to what you know on a competition piece.

    Chris
     
  7. Shannon

    Shannon New Member

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    Chris- I do bondo on split ears all the time and it works great. If its a split that is real skinny and narrow, I'll split it as close as I can without blowing out the ear and then use someting like a welding rod or coat hanger and use that to open the ear all the way to the tip of the split. Sometimes it works, sometimes not and I blow the ear and have to repair. I'll also poke a couple of small holes with a Tpin to let the air out. Any bondo on the hair gets removed with lacquer thinner. As for the comp. thing and using earliners on my comp pieces I've got that covered also. I have a whole freezer full of personal wt capes. I plan to practice on some of the poorer quality ones first, and save my comp. capes for when I've got the liners down. I'm sure liners will take alot of practice, it's a good thing I have lots of capes! I don't think I could do something one way all the time, and then switch over to something different for the first time and compete with it and win. My first attempt at something is usually not my best. I always compete with my best work. Shannon.
     
  8. michael p.

    michael p. Getting better with age :)

    Chris, it is really NO problem opening the splits far enough. So are you implying that you do not turn your ears alll the way if they are? If so how do you keep them from curling? IMO this is where the bondo method saves your butt, not impedes it.
     
  9. Turkey Creek

    Turkey Creek Member

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    I guess I wasn't clear. I turn my ears to the very edge including the split areas. I am saying that if the ear blows out completely on the split then so be it. That is where the earliner shines, because you don't repair the split in the skin. You adjust the earliner to fit and then glue. Trying to sew a split on the edge of an ear gives a very rough edge most of the time. (IMO if you don't ocassionally blow a small hole on the edge of the ear then you aren't turning your ears far enough no matter what method you use, bondo or earliner). Clean up any excess glue and you are good to go. If you have thinned the earliner properly on the edges you will have the best ear hands down. Winning with a bondo ear in this day and age (with anything larger than a bobcat ear) is a long shot. I use earliners 99% of the time, the rest of the time it is strictly clay or apoxy sculpt for a very small ear.

    Chris
     
  10. michael p.

    michael p. Getting better with age :)

    Here's a "long shot" Muledeer mounted by Jet Smith & judged by Manny Chavez that took a Blue in Master's. That must make it a "hell of a long shot" :D

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Turkey Creek

    Turkey Creek Member

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    Yep it was!! Nice deer. I didn't say it couldn't be done. Somebody in the masters div. has the best chance to pull off a bondo ear, as by that time if you can't produce a quality ear you aren't in Masters to begin with.

    Was that piece judged best of catergory?

    Chris
     
  12. mdupertuis

    mdupertuis Active Member

    This has been a good thread. I have picked up a lot of pointers adn ideas. I think I am going to start cutting the ears off of road killed deer and practicing on them. The ears are definitely the place I have the most trouble with.
     
  13. Turkey Creek

    Turkey Creek Member

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    I agree with the turning part (especially freezer burned ears), that is one job I could do without. I have an old wooden baseball bat that I have cut and sanded the handle down to a rounded point. It helps considerably when turning ears. Most of the time the ear openers are a joke. Nothing makes a great mount stand out though like nice crisp ears and appropriate ear butts.

    Chris
     
  14. livbucks

    livbucks Well-Known Member

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    I don't find turning ears and removing cartiliage difficult at all and I do it rather quickly. But the again, I guess I never mounted anything that was very mature in age either. The ears get harder to do the older the deer. Cuts, splits, scars, frostbite and more connective tissue make the job harder, I guess.
     
  15. cattrax

    cattrax Beats being in the shop!

    Just a tip that I use to turn ears quickly. I take an old knife sharpening steel to run a "pilot hole" up the ear. You kind of have to work it around to get it started. I run it up as far as it will go fairly easily to about an inch from the tip. Then I change to the ear openers and work from the pilot hole. Works great for me and is very fast.
     
  16. visions of wildlife taxid

    visions of wildlife taxid love me or leave me, just dont try to convert me

    i used liners on every deer i did since i started 5 years ago, this year i went to bondo ears on commercial deer, best move i ever made, alot quicker, and i have one fella i have done a deer a year for , for the last 4 seasons, this year i used bondo, and i geuss i got the ultimate in compliments, because he said he like this deer better than the last 3 , mainly because the ears looked crisper, i am sold on bondo for my commercial deer, never again will i use earliners for commercial work, Russ
     
  17. livbucks

    livbucks Well-Known Member

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    And here I thought that liners were developed to make thinner,crisper ears possible.
     
  18. I use bondo on all my ears. Actually I use Fiber-Hair filler made by NAPA. It's expensive, but I love the results. I don't have to worry about pushing the bondo out of an area with this stuff. Once it's spread around, it stays and gives me plenty of time to shape, smooth and thin. You can get pretty crisp ears using it. It's impossible to get as thin, but unless you're feeling the ear from both sides it is not noticable. Here's a coues deer I mounted using bondo. Besides the ears being too pink (I toned them down later) I like the way they came out.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Thanks!!! I use bondo on everything, including mulies, elk, and oryx.
     
  20. Glen Seekins

    Glen Seekins New Member

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    I have used bondo on bears, but never have tried it on deer. I always remove the cartilage before i salt the cape and all my capes get wet tanned by a tannery. I just dont know if i could leave that much shrinkable cartilage in...Im going to have to try it sometime. Do you have to do anything different for controlling the drying?

    I take the cartilage out in one piece from the tip of the ear as far down the but as i can then freeze them. When im ready to mount (usually while doing form prep) I lay the cartilage out on some blue form able paper board (dont remember the name its been so long since i had to buy it but available from Research). I trace out the cartilage for each ear and form the shape into the blue board to match the real cartilage (with steam and microwave). where the cartilage is thicker i add clay and i sand down the edges so they are paper thin. It sounds like quite a process, but it only takes about 5 minuets per ear. I put them aside and when i mount the deer the ears fit perfectly ever time and if the ear is torn or has a nic out of the edge it shows on my new earliners. For adhesive i use 5 minuet epoxy and clean the ears with brake cleaner (see how well that strips the oils off your skin!!) Brake cleaner doesnt leave a residue, doesnt stink up the shop and comes in a nice aerosol can. I spread the glue onto the skin and onto the earliner very thin and work it thinner after inserting the ear liner. Nice crisp, thin ears and i dont think i could get them to drum if i tried. the glue under the skin kicks in about 5 minuets and when i started i used 30 minuet stuff so i had more time.

    Glen