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Newborn goat mount

Discussion in 'Lifesize Mammals' started by ofearthandbone, Jun 16, 2015.

  1. ofearthandbone

    ofearthandbone New Member

    I just recieved a newborn goat that didn't make it through the night. I would like to mount this sleeping in a nest of hay for a wall mount. Any suggestions on body? Normally I use the wrap method for birds and squirrels. I did a raccoon using the stuffed method which came out great. It was laying, hanging over a limb so I didn't have much posing to deal with.
     
  2. Museum Man

    Museum Man Well-Known Member

    if you did a carcass cast you would get a better fit
     

  3. ofearthandbone

    ofearthandbone New Member

    I'm not familiar with this process. I will look it up. Is it simply called a carcass cast? Would I do it in sections?
     
  4. rbear

    rbear Well-Known Member

    https://www.taxidermytrainingunlimited.com/JR-CarcassCasting.html
    Ralph
     
  5. ofearthandbone

    ofearthandbone New Member

    I just came along this site while searching for info. This costs money. Not interested in dropping 25$ for this. Thanks though. I'm going to keep searching the web. I'm very curious about this process. Not anything I have ever done before. I did read it's very time consuming and when selling the cost of sale would be much higher than average do to labor. I'm a beginner though and want to learn everything!
     
  6. You could try altering a deer fawn form to fit the baby goat? I know I did a baby goat a few years ago and ran into the same problem of finding a form that would work since I did not have the carcass to cast and no suppliers carry form for most farm animals. I could have wrapped it but wanted to try to find a form of a different animal to see if that would work. I know some folks here who have mounted them used fawn forms but they require a lot of altering in the face and legs due to the different anatomy of the two animals and that the age of the baby goat is a factor.

    In my case, Mckenzie carries a Mouflon Lamb form that I used for the baby goat I had. Still had to alter quite a bit on it but was probably less alterations then I would have had to do with a fawn form.

    [​IMG]

    Here was the goat when she was finished. She was one of my older pieces but one I had a lot of fun and learned a lot working on!

    [​IMG]

    If you can't carcass cast, I would go with either wrapping the body with wood wool or getting a fawn or the Mouflon Lamb form and altering it to fit the goat you are working on.
     
  7. ofearthandbone

    ofearthandbone New Member

    What a little sweet pea! Nice job! I think I will try the wood wool wrap method as this will leave me more option to pose in a curled up sleeping position. Was the goat skin easy to work with? Thick...thin? Any recommended method for dorsal or ventral?
     
  8. rbear

    rbear Well-Known Member

    Casting is allot of fun. There is a bit to learn before you can cast a body but it's not to hard. Most generally there are alterations after the casting to fix dripping muscles. If you want to have a quick lesson in anatomy try casting a body it will teach you allot.
    Ralph
     
  9. ofearthandbone

    ofearthandbone New Member

    Yeah, I will try casting...on something different though. Roadkill. I can't risk this goat. It's definatlytly the best animal I will have done. I'm still a beginner apprentice. Casting sounds like a lot of fun!
     
  10. The skin itself was probably average for a skin? I know it wasn't thin like some baby animal skins I have but wasn't thick either. In your case a newborn goat might have thinner skin and would just be careful and not man handling it too much. I myself prefer dorsal cuts for my animals since I find it easier to sew. Depending of the pose can determine what would be the best cut on the skin as some poses work better with a ventral than a dorsal and vice versa.
     
  11. ofearthandbone

    ofearthandbone New Member

    I do prefer dorsal too, much easier to skin. I have an option here so I think dorsal will work. It will be nested in a circular "nest" literally so you won't be able to see top or underside. It will be curled in sleeping position.
     
  12. Nancy C

    Nancy C Well-Known Member

    I've never tried to mount a baby goat, but I've learned a lot about goats in general since I bought some last year.
    One thing I learned is that a LOT of baby goats die very young, especially when they come from does who gave birth to 3 or more. The bodies are usually thrown away because the people who lose them have no idea that those babies might be wanted by someone even after they're dead.
    I strongly suspect that you could get LOTS of dead baby goats if you wanted them and could pay to have them shipped to you. The main time for kidding is already past, but there will be random kids born throughout the year.
    If you're interested, try checking out www.thegoatspot.net/forum/

    Since it isn't unusual for goats to be eaten, you're a lot less likely to encounter people who are horrified at the idea of them being used for taxidermy than you would be at, say, a forum dedicated to horses.
     
  13. ofearthandbone

    ofearthandbone New Member

    My friend has goats and two just deliver last week. One baby didn't make it through the night. Honestly, it's bitter sweet for me and she knew this when thinking I would want him. So sad for such a thing to lose. This was her first time with birthing goats and felt I would honor it well. I hope I don't let her down.
     
  14. ofearthandbone

    ofearthandbone New Member