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Turkey head painting question

Discussion in 'Bird Taxidermy' started by Shawn73, Jun 16, 2015.

  1. Shawn73

    Shawn73 Active Member

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    I got a really hairy one here I painted how do you guys deal with the hair and feathers, clean each hair,paint black,etc. This is for my mount so I will spend more time on mine then a commercial mount. Especially you competition turkey taxidermy people.
     
  2. capnmike

    capnmike New Member

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    If you don't want to pluck them and glue them back in then my best results come from hand painting the head with a brush and pay attention to keep paint off the feathers and hairs. Painting the hairs black doesn't work very well.
     

  3. Shawn73

    Shawn73 Active Member

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    O is that what guys do on competition pieces pluck them and glue them back.? Makes sense. Thanks
     
  4. Mascara brush
     
  5. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Laquer thinner and brush, I'm told, will work if you don't get too close to the head. I have also heard the mascara trick works well. Some do pluck the feathers and glue them back in. I know of one guy who burns all the hairs off so he doesn't have deal with them, but to me ,they look like an artificial head when you do that.
     
  6. capnmike

    capnmike New Member

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    Why don't you paint a couple hairs and feathers and try a few things until you find something that works for you. You can always pluck those couple feathers if your efforts don't make you happy. I have tried just about everything. If you were going to paint them I would use oil base paint before mascara. I think they look better with paint on them than mascara.
     
  7. Airbrushing will give you the most accurate paint job so dial down your paint flow and paint very close to the skin. You should be painting between feathers not over the top of them. The ONLY area that should get overspray usually is the white cap which has feathers that are more like hairs. I like to touch shoe polish onto these and let them quickly drink it down the shaft.
     
  8. jimss

    jimss Member

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    It seems like you could put something on the tiny feathers that you can rub off once you paint the head? I've done that a few times with fish using Art Masking Fluid. Obviously the original feather color would have to suffice?
     
  9. B Jones

    B Jones Memeber of - NTA,UTA,AIT.Proud Member of NZTA.


    The best in my opinion, Shawn did you get the package I sent last week?
     
  10. clschake

    clschake New Member

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    Anyone try "dry brushing"?
    Also on the painting head subject...
    The colors are supposed to represent mood right?
    More flesh tone when not excited, Blue when happy excited, and more red "in action"?
    So not just the bird but pose would suggest how much of each color shows?
    My son said his bird (s) were bright red, running in... he didn't see any white. After looking at the heads while laying there, he likes it has the faint blue and white showing through. I've spent a couple of weeks now nights looking at videos, watching the colors change, leg positions, trying to see the wing positions... height, and when they blow up...
    So If bright red running in... if it were slightly inflated, it would start to show more white and blue but not overwhelming. Then the red "bumps" showing as the colors slowly change... such as maybe a 3/4 strut?
     
  11. Jim McNamara

    Jim McNamara Well-Known Member

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    I tried the mascara trick but it looks thick to me. Since the heads are painted ahead of time I sit down with a small brush and water based paint and magnifying glasses and paint them. I don't get them all but a lot of them. If I get paint on the head it comes off pretty easily with a q tip and glass cleaner. Never tried or heard of the shoe polish technique and will keep it in mind. It takes about 10-15 minutes to get the look I am happy with.
     
  12. capnmike

    capnmike New Member

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    Your overthinking it. With turkeys you can find a picture to represent any variation of the colors you can think of. It is an ongoing debate among turkey hunters on what mood determines which color the head is. One will say all red is fired up and the other will say no that is relaxed. I have seen it both ways. Just find a picture of a head that you like and try to replicate it. There are so many variations you won't be "wrong"
     
  13. Nancy C

    Nancy C Well-Known Member

    Turkey heads change minute by minute. The biggest caruncles usually stay bright red, but not always. They can sometimes change to pink or even to white. (But not blue - the ability to change to blue is restricted to certain areas.)

    Since the color is caused only by blood and not by pigment, they tend to show more red when the weather is hot, but again - not always.

    Pinkish (lighter on top of the head) with some red on the caruncles and some pale, lavenderish-blue on the face seems to be the relaxed default, at least for my birds.
     
  14. smalliestalker

    smalliestalker and a river runs through it.

    I found this interesting about the "seven-faced bird".

    "Did you know that turkeys change color depending on their mood? Well, turkey skin, it turns out, can shift from red to blue to white, thanks to bundles of collagen that are interspersed with a dense array of blood vessels. It is this color-shifting characteristic that gives turkeys the name “seven-faced birds” in Japanese and Korean.

    Scientists discovered that spacing between the collagen fibers changes when the blood vessels swell or contract, depending upon whether the bird is excited or angry. The amount of swelling changes the way light waves are scattered and, in turn, alters the colors we see on the bird’s head."

    from the California Academy of Sciences

    http://www.calacademy.org/explore-science/turkey-sensors
     

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  15. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Cut around a wattle and you get some blood. Cut a wattle and watch it pour out. Those bumps can contain a lot of blood for a reason. One thing I don't think I have seen as far as reference and turkey watching goes, is red cheeks and /or cap when strutting. I have seen standing and running/walking turkeys with red cheeks and caps, but I haven't seen it on strutters. Now someone will post a picture of a strutter with a red cap and cheeks because with turkeys it's pretty much anything goes if you stay with reds, whites and blues.
     
  16. clschake

    clschake New Member

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    oh man...
    i just closed a picture of a strutter with a red cap!
    it was white under in the creases but def. red cap. that whole head was red, but the blue was still under in the creases around the eyes too. From any distance it would appear to be all red.
     
  17. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I went on line looking for one after I wrote that and found four out of a hundred that would qualify, as I said, anything is possible as long as you stick to shads of red, white and blue.
     
  18. clschake

    clschake New Member

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    Tanglewood I think I only found 2 in thousands of videos and pictures, even in my own back yard most had the white, but at least I believe my son now. But I still find it hard to believe they were BOTH all red. I think in the excitement he was seeing "RED". LOL
     
  19. turkeyshooter

    turkeyshooter Member

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    For a commercial bird I am with Buckyb3. The mascara brush works for me. Just have to take your time and not get too much of the mascara on the brush. If you do just use an older brush with none on it to clean up the hairs with too much mascara. Just my 2 cents. Just like a woman with too much makeup on. You can get too much.
     
  20. turkeyshooter

    turkeyshooter Member

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    For a commercial bird I am with Buckyb3. The mascara brush works for me. Just have to take your time and not get too much of the mascara on the brush. If you do just use an older brush with none on it to clean up the hairs with too much mascara. Just my 2 cents. Just like a woman with too much makeup on. You can get too much.