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Salt question

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by Andrew M, Aug 8, 2015.

  1. Does food grade salt work for tanning and salting??? If not why?
     
  2. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Salt (NaCl) salt is salt. I have always used food grade. I prefer bakers salt as it is super fine. Fine salt covers better and penetrates quicker.
     

  3. Wonderful! Thank you!
     
  4. woakley144

    woakley144 Active Member

    I have been purchasing my salt at the pool supply, It says to be food grade salt for swimming pools. The guys that taught me to tan said be sure to use a NON-IODINE salt.
     
  5. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Wyatt, the guy who taught you was misinformed. The source of that feared the iodine would turn white hair and leather purple. There are infinitive trace amounts of iodine in a pound of salt that will have no effects on appearance. Iodized salt works just fine.
     
  6. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I have used a lot of Iodized salt a lot many years ago and it was not a problem.
     
  7. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Too many people had a Mr. Wizard Chemistry set and think that everything is static. Iodine in salt (AT THE FACTORY) is said to by .075 mg per gram. There are about 15.5 grains in a gram and one thousand micrograins in grain. Fo for every gram of salt AT THE FACTORY, you have about1/10th of a grain in one gram of salt. Now I say AT THE FACTORY because the iodine solutions actually evaporate when they contact the air. So if you were to keep your salt in a buck like I do, it's likely the salt wouldn't even contain any iodine by the time you got around to using it.

    Cyclone, if I have that screwed up, please correct it. You know math ain't my forte.
     
  8. woakley144

    woakley144 Active Member

    Thanks George.... I never thought about the iodine being in natural salt....... but your right IT IS!!!
     
  9. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    Here's a few links to digest while I check George's math...(not my strong suit either George...)

    http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,320436.msg2193142.html#msg2193142

    http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,288576.msg1994669.html#msg1994669

    http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,76373.msg489053.html#msg489053

    http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,190064.msg1340366.html#msg1340366

    http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,182435.msg1282988.html#msg1282988

    http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,363245.msg2443159.html#msg2443159

    http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,370463.msg2486490.html#msg2486490
     
  10. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    [quote author=http://www.saltinstitute.org/news-articles/iodized-salt/]
    The technology of iodizing salt

    The salt industry plays an indispensible role in the global campaign against Iodine Deficiency Disorders by producing iodized salt.

    Modern salt plants routinely spray potassium iodide or potassium iodate onto the salt while it moves along a conveyor belt before it is packaged. In lower-tech operations, iodine is sometimes added as a dry ingredient and physically mixed with the salt. Generally, iodized salt contains 0.002% to 0.004% iodine, supplied either as potassium iodide or potassium iodate.

    In the U.S., iodine is added as potassium iodide in table salt at slightly higher levels (0.006% to 0.01% potassium iodide, equivalent to 0.0046% to 0.0077% iodine. Potassium iodide is one of two sources of iodine permissible by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Although animal feeds are fortified with iodine in the form of potassium iodate, the form most commonly used globally to iodize food salt outside the U.S. because of its greater stability, FDA does not approve potassium iodate to fortify food salt in the U.S. Therefore, U.S. salt producers add sodium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate when they iodize salt to increase alkalinity, and sodium thiosulfate or dextrose to stabilize potassium iodide. Without a stabilizer, potassium iodide is oxidized to iodine and lost by volatilization from the product.

    Outside the U.S. iodine is most commonly added as the more stable potassium iodate and at lower, varying levels.
    [/quote]
     
  11. southrock

    southrock New Member

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    i have been useing pool salt for years its usually around five bucks a bag buy it at a wholesale pool supply
     
  12. JL

    JL Taxidermist for 64 years

    I buy and use Stockman salt at Tractor Supply, never had a problem. JL
     
  13. pir^2h

    pir^2h Retrievers give you the bird

    George, where do you get this "Food grade salt" you talk about that is so fine? I thought everything sold at the store was food grade! I could see where a finer salt would be better so I am not disputing that.
     
  14. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Professional bakeries and cake makers use a superfine grade of salt that's about half the grain size as grocery store salt. It's about the consistency of sugar, though a bit bigger. I get mine through SYSCO and a 50 pound bag runs about $12-$15. Now it does have the tendency to clump up (not bad, just being honest) and bumping the salt bucket or running it through a rat wire screen brings it quickly back to its original. I should have said "baker's grade" salt.
     
  15. krank

    krank New Member

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    I have always used stock salt for leather and pickling salt for fur. Only reason is stock salt has dirt in it. It settles out and no big deal.
    The local butcher uses rock salt on his cowhides. He lays them on a wood deck and covers them with dirty old rock salt. By spring he has a 2 ft tall pile oozing juice.
     
  16. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Your butcher doesn't care if the hair falls out. They're likely going to a sausage casing plant or to China to made leather.
     
  17. krank

    krank New Member

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    Theres a lot of fat and meat stuck to the hide and he is just keeping it from getting putrid and rotting.
     
  18. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001


    You are missing the point, He sure as heck isn't selling those hides to someone that wants a "Hair on" end product...
     
  19. krank

    krank New Member

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    Not missing any point.
    Its the common practice was just as I said. Stack and layer with salt. The leather industry is not concerned with delipidation. Buffalo hunters were the same way.
    The cowhide /deer hide buyer doesn't give a hoot if the hair is slipping.
    If for some reason they wanted a hair on hide then it was treated separately and scraped immediately.
     
  20. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    ::)