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Tanning Cream?

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Aizui, Sep 17, 2015.

  1. Aizui

    Aizui Taxidermist

    101
    0
    USA
    1. Can you rehydrate a pelt (tanned with tanning cream) once it is dried out? Will it become malleable or stiff as a board?
    2. Will the tanning cream make the skin hard as a rock when dried or will it stay flexible?

    Honestly, I don't know too much about tanning creams and any insight on these questions or tanning cream in general would be great!
     
  2. whitetails and fish only

    whitetails and fish only Well-Known Member

    I have allowed liqua tanned capes to fully dry, they become more flexible than a raw skin, but are still quite stiff. I then rehydrate in a borax saturate solution which brings them back to a very soft and stretchable condition. Only time this did not work well was on a cape that had been liqua tanned and dryed for about 30 years. Probably should not leave in the dry state more than a year.
     

  3. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    All tanned leather will dry stiff, you will need to break and bend the fibers loose. Just like leather shoes and boots that get soaked wet, they will dry stiff, and you need to walk them soft again.
     
  4. Aizui

    Aizui Taxidermist

    101
    0
    USA
    Thanks for the answers you guys! I have one more question though...
    When the cream is put on on the green hide does it have to been temperature controlled? In other words after the cream is rubbed into the skin will it have to stay within room temperature when "tanning" or can it freeze? (I understand that pelts shouldn't get warm since it is a dead animal) Does it depend on the cream?
     
  5. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    What does the instructions on the cream say?
    Best to apply, let set for a couple hours, then bag and fridge overnight, then rinse out and start drying, or freeze for later.
     
  6. Aizui

    Aizui Taxidermist

    101
    0
    USA
    Basically that is what the instructions say it doesn't mention any temperature in the process so does the temperature of the air affect the outcome, when the cream is applied?
     
  7. Paul B

    Paul B Active Member

    2,465
    23
    I would look at it this way, if the directions doesn't say to refrigerate, which I believe is an extra step, I would keep at room temp. The colder the temp the longer the tanning process takes, especially freezing after applying.
     
  8. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    Did you salt, rehydrate, pickle, and neutralize the hide before adding the tanning cream? You don't just rub tanning cream onto a raw hide.
     
  9. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Most tanning creams have the "pickle" step as an option. I haven't pickled a cream tanned hide in over 30 years and never had an issue. I do, however, salt overnight because unless you remove the moisture from the hide, the cream is not going to absorb into the hide.
     
  10. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    By "cream" do you mean a rub on tan or a submersible?
     
  11. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    Yes, temperature is a factor. These tans, unless otherwise noted in the DIRECTIONS, are meant to be used at ambient or room temperature.

    Take Low T's advice...
     
  12. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Boarhunter, i'm not sure what a "rub on" tan is. That term was once used for the cream tans that, at that time, was suggested that you just take your hand and "rub" it into the hide. After a few reports of dermititis and some acid burns, people wised up that perhaps using a brush would be better. Van Dykes used to carry Curatan which was in a jellied form but I'm not sure that's available any more. Rineharts JRTS and Headquarters PT are more liquified and directions require painting it on. All of them can be "submerged" or pickled, but it's simply not necessary in using them.
     
  13. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    George, when I tan myself and don't send it out I use either krowtann--which as you know isn't really a "tan" but is good on really iffy thin skinned bobcat and coyotes, or I use TruBond. When I use krowtann, I always submerge. When I use Trubond, I always rub/paint it on. I'm not sure if the directions for Trubond say you can use it without pickling, but I've always pickled even when I tried JRTS. I've heard the new JRTS isn't as good as the old stuff, but anyway with TruBond I've always had great stretch and great results. I've also tried many others such as Pro-1, but I always pickle. I know some people use a pressure tanner or whatever, the machine that you put a raw hide in and it's done quickly, but I've never done anything except flesh, salt, rehdrate, pickle, shave, pickle, neutralize, tan, and sometimes oil. It's over 100 here and I would be weary of putting tanning cream on a raw hide without pickling it first. I'm not saying my way is better. It's just what I'm used to.
     
  14. Aizui

    Aizui Taxidermist

    101
    0
    USA
    Thank you for all the responses! I have not actually used the tanning cream since I wanted to get some more research on it first before applying. I was looking into getting Dan Rinehart Tanning Cream since I have heard good things about it. I have heard that you should pickle the hide, I have also heard that it isn't required. Has anyone used this specific cream and what worked best for it? Does it have an odor and is it safe to apply outside and let it sit inside? Once again thank you so much for all the information. It is hard trying to locate reliable information online since Taxidermy is more of a master/apprentice learning curve.
     
  15. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I use Liqua tan. I have used it without a pickle, with a pickle and with Pretan. They all worked well and they all look the same in the end and years later, no sign of deterioration and such. I prefer to use a pickle then Liqua tan it. I would consider Liqua tan a rub on ( paint on) tan. I use a gloved hand to rub it into the hide.