1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Fleshing gloves

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by TNRebel, Oct 31, 2015.

  1. TNRebel

    TNRebel New Member

    19
    0
    Got my new fleshing machine mounted on the table, tanned a scrap deer hide from last year with Krowwtan and started practicing. Everything was going good until one careless split second. Took a nice chunk out of the top of my left thumb! :eek: Which gloves would you guys recommend? Kevlar or steel wire fillet gloves? No more fleshing for me without them. Thanks
     
  2. D.Price

    D.Price Well-Known Member

    I can't answer the glove question as I don't wear gloves....but if you will make it a practice to keep both thumbs pointed straight up as you grasp the skin you will eliminate this problem.

    DP
     

  3. GWebb

    GWebb Well-Known Member

    I just double up on rubber gloves on my left hand and don't rush things. It seems like with the rubber gloves I have that micro-second to stop and pull back. Many might argue but since I started doing this I have yet to get cut.
     
  4. TNRebel

    TNRebel New Member

    19
    0
    Thanks for the tip but I think I will have to wear them for a while. It was a pretty bad cut and its got me a little spooked. BTW, I like your flag! I'm a member of the General George Gibbs Dibrell camp#875 in Sparta, Tn
     
  5. D.Price

    D.Price Well-Known Member

    Colonel Henry K. Burgwyn Jr. Camp #1485 Wendell, NC
     
  6. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Ignore the gloveless hero's. They get bit, they just don't acknowledge it in public. Even cheap brown jersey gloves will save you from swearing and being an idiot. After my first cut 13 years ago, I haven't had a cut since because of cut resistant gloves. Any glove is better than bleeding.
     
  7. D.Price

    D.Price Well-Known Member


    LOL Paul, it's pretty simple if you don't touch it, it can't cut you. Yes I have been bit, had stitches more times than I can count over the last 28 years. It's just part of the job.

    DP
     
  8. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    I work with a guy that just will not put gloves on, he insists that he does a better job without them, and he pisses and moans every time he gets bit. I tell him every time, and he won't do it. So if they won't take advice, why give it? Use seat belts? Practice safe firearm procedures? I love to play my guitar, but if my finger tips are half cut off, it's no fun.
     
  9. D.Price

    D.Price Well-Known Member

    No fingers can touch the blade

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Thumbs can touch the blade and will eventually get cut

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    DP
     
  10. TNRebel

    TNRebel New Member

    19
    0
    Hey,there's John Griffith! I took his three day course back in June. I bought a S&S machine like his (newer version). It's the one that bit me! I also need some help on how to set the guards on this thing.
     
  11. D.Price

    D.Price Well-Known Member

    I hope he didn't teach you to hold your thumbs that way!

    DP
     
  12. TNRebel

    TNRebel New Member

    19
    0
    Lol. No, we didn't do any work on the machine. We did flesh two capes and then put them in the tan. Should have had him show me how to set the guards though. How much of the blade do you expose on the left (cutting) side? On the right I've been told two different settings. One with the blade exposed about 1/8th". The other with the guard even with the blade.
     
  13. D.Price

    D.Price Well-Known Member

    It's a feel thing more than a measurement, because it will look different depending on the angle you are observing it from, plus as the blade gets smaller after regrinding it the cutting surface size changes.

    DP
     
  14. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    I use surgical gloves to keep my hands clean but I have to agree with D. Price. If you learn proper technique and set those guards correctly, the gloves are simply window dressing. Your thumbs need to be STRAIGHT UP AND TILTED AWAY FROM THE WHEEL. That way, if a hide grabs, the heel of your thumb hits the guard and you start over. The Kevlar gloves will cut through. I repeat, WILL CUT THROUGH. I mean, how do you suppose they cut the material out to sew them up????? Chain mail gloves?? Don't think I'm going to trash my round knife by using them.

    I will tell you one thing about fleshing bears. Often the fat is overpoweing. Go to Harbor Freight and buy a 6 pack of their cotton work gloves with the rubber dots on them. Put on surgical gloves and then the cotton gloves. They will allow you to horse that fat, slimy mess of a bear hide without it slipping from your hand. When you're done, roll them off your hand into the trash bin. They're not much over $1 a pair and you'd spend twice that getting the grease out of them.
     
  15. joeym

    joeym Old Murphey

    I'm long overdue for a shaving machine mishap. I wear surgical gloves most of the time, but very often head to the machine bare-handed just to do a little touch-up.
     
  16. I wear a leather construction glove as a beginner. I just think its better to be safe than sorry.
     
  17. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Nothing wrong with that Charlie. The only drawback is that you will never get the "feel" of the hide in your hands. Since you'r shaving the back of a hide, the thickness of it can't reall be known until you cut through one. No one wants to get that, so you have to get the "feel" of a properly thinned hide and know when to stop before the hide is shaved apart.
     
  18. Thanks for that info George, I hadn't thought of it like that. I have only shaved 1 elk cape and 4 deer so far so I'm still figuring it out. The next one I do I will remove the gloves and start working to prefect the shaving of the capes.