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Howler Monkey Skull ID

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by xxohmycaptainxx, Jan 27, 2016.

  1. xxohmycaptainxx

    xxohmycaptainxx Member

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    So I've been cleaning up a mummified Howler Monkey skull for a friend and we're both trying to figure out which species it is. I remember someone on here who works with a university or museum who specializes in monkeys and primates, would you be able to help?

    The skull originates from Rio Chambria Peru so I've narrowed it down to Jurua Red Howler, Purus Red Howler, Venezuelan Red Howler, Mantled Howler, or Ecuadorian Mantled Howler just by checking to see which species are native to Peru. If anyone could help at all please let me know and I'll send or upload pics of the skulls before cleaning and what it looks like now. It is not done being cleaned but I removed a lot of the dried skin and flesh so you can at least see the base shapes and details of the skull.
     
  2. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Why not post pics here so we can all be jealous? :)
     

  3. AH7

    AH7 New Member

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    I'm sure you are referring to me, but I second SW's request: post pictures here and give us all a crack! I've got a bunch of howler skulls from Peru, but some of the people on here are better at IDing specimens than I am.
     
  4. AH7

    AH7 New Member

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    I was hoping to hear something by now - or better yet, see something!
     
  5. xxohmycaptainxx

    xxohmycaptainxx Member

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    [​IMG]

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    This is all I got for now. Here's the head before I started. The skull wasn't really macerating. The flesh just slightly rehydrated so it felt like slightly dry bacon. I ended up hand removing all the skin and flesh I could and then got it back into maceration. Its degreasing a lot but its not really macerating. i'm starting to see some decay of the meat but its going very slow. Here's the skull after being picked "clean". Oh and btw, I was referring to you Great Skulls.

    [​IMG]

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  6. Mmmmmm... monkey jerky! :)
     
  7. AH7

    AH7 New Member

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    Awesome!
     
  8. No hyoid bones, right?
     
  9. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Wow. Looking at that, I wonder if it was a preserved specimen that was allowed to dry out. What was the origin of that? Almost would have considered keeping it on a shelf that way. Creepy looking.
     
  10. xxohmycaptainxx

    xxohmycaptainxx Member

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    Its been a gross skull to work on. No hyoids. Not sure of its origin completely. My friend got it from someone whose had it for over 25 years and said it originated from a tribal collection. My friend got it for super cheap and asked me to clean it up. Any of you got a clue as to what species it could be? I listed the only possibilities in the first comment, based on where the skull was collected as we do know where it came from but not who was responsible for collecting it. Its very old. Based on how it looked and felt pre-cleaning I'd say its at least 50 years old, probably closer to 100 years old to be honest though. Its old as dirt.
     
  11. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    You might want to try soaking that for a while in water that has a good amount of ammonia in it. Can't hurt with the degreasing and something about the ammonia seems to soften flesh up. I'd also consider doing that and then getting it to someone with beetles. The bugs might just go for it with the ammonia soak.
     
  12. xxohmycaptainxx

    xxohmycaptainxx Member

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    That's what a friend on facebook was saying. I really wanted to avoid having to do that though as I didn't want to add to the cost of the cleaning by having to send it out. I think I'm just going to continue with it for another week or so and see how it goes. My friend doesn't mind waiting around for it. Its coming along. I can certainly see some breakdown of the flesh but its very slow. I've been removing some of the water every few days and adding fresh maceration water from other jars with skulls in them that are finished macerating. Hoping that'll keep the bacteria populations nice and high. We'll see how it goes. It's definitely degreasing though as I can visibly see a ton of grease floating on the surface of the water.