1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

watusi horns

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by CA Trapper, Feb 2, 2016.

  1. CA Trapper

    CA Trapper Member

    580
    1
    are they like cow horns or more like bison horns? I have a weathered set and they look like compressed hair but it could be that they're just so weathered.
     
  2. AH7

    AH7 New Member

    1,281
    2
    Watusi are a breed of cattle.
     

  3. CA Trapper

    CA Trapper Member

    580
    1
    This is true GS but the condition of these particular horns had me unsure. I guess they're just too old to fix.
     
  4. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Should be like longhorns but the live ones I've seen have weird horns that are huge at the bases. Makes me think they are thinner than normal cattle horns. Post a picture?
     
  5. Kurt27

    Kurt27 New Member

    I have one dealing with a Watusi and it wasn't easy! They are just like compressed hair, was rediculously hard to get them off the skull and they were super soft and thin at the bases.
     
  6. sgsmith

    sgsmith Member

    I am mounting a Watusi that has a diameter of 6in at the base, they are like any cattle horns only a lot bigger, the horns slipped off the cores very easy.
     
  7. AH7

    AH7 New Member

    1,281
    2
    This idea of "compressed" hair is a bit of a red herring; all horns that fit over a horn core (i.e., not giraffe "horns" or antlers, but everything else) are mostly made of keratin - the same protein that hair and fingernails are made from. Thus, all of these horns are basically made of compressed hair. It just so happens that some fall apart very easily (into hairlike shreds) while others hold up better to manipulation. I think it is not very helpful to think of them as binary (i.e., "compressed hair" vs. real-er horns) but rather on a continuum of delicateness - and various approaches can shove even the strongest horns into the shred zone - like weathering, macerating or various chemical techniques.
     
  8. AH7

    AH7 New Member

    1,281
    2
    This idea of "compressed" hair is a bit of a red herring; all horns that fit over a horn core (i.e., not giraffe "horns" or antlers, but everything else) are mostly made of keratin - the same protein that hair and fingernails are made from. Thus, all of these horns are basically made of compressed hair. It just so happens that some fall apart very easily (into hairlike shreds) while others hold up better to manipulation. I think it is not very helpful to think of them as binary (i.e., "compressed hair" vs. real-er horns) but rather on a continuum of delicateness - and various approaches can shove even the strongest horns into the shred zone - like weathering, macerating or various chemical techniques.
     
  9. skullclnr

    skullclnr Active Member

    Very thin horns, like a long horn. Easy to get off and piece of cake to clean, size is the only issue. I have cleaned them almost 6ft tip to tip.