1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Art degrees, taxidermy and Ladies.

Discussion in 'The Taxidermy Industry' started by PA, Jul 9, 2016.

  1. PA

    PA Well-Known Member

    1,641
    1,792
    On another thread which has brought some liveliness to the Taxidermy.net there was some mention of art degrees and design being necessary to win awards at competitions. KatieC and Amy came up in the discussion, and Joe thought some formal training in art is necessary to really win the highest awards at the world show. I have visited Katie’s website and also watch Amy’s on a regular basis - they both do great work, and are taxidermists and naturalists more so than artists.

    Art degrees these days have changed as much as taxidermy competitions have changed. When Joe was a youngster, art students were still studying the masters of old – Leonardo Da Vinci, Rembrant, Donatello, Michelangelo, Raphael and Splinter. But Andy Warhol changed all of that by making a different kind of art which unfortunately caught on. These days art is in the viewed by the eye of people that think very differently than I learned when I took an art class in college in 1972. I am not sure the basics of color and negative space and flow is being taught today as it had been then, but art degrees are still a mainstay in colleges and universities – most protagonists which end up as starving artists about at the same levels as starving taxidermists.

    There is a new breed of artist-taxidermists, primarily ladies, who have large followings and think much different than us older guys who started taxidermy 50 years ago. Some are Rogue taxidermists and are exceedingly proud of that moniker, but others are very traditional taxidermists and will be carrying on the torch of taxidermy when sportsman begin to lose the right to hunt and that may be unfortunately happening sooner than we like. Democracy is a two-edged sword.

    The taxidermists that frequent this site aren’t always open to these new views of using taxidermy in art or the way they might be portrayed in the press. The New Jersey rogue division last year and the post regarding Ethical Taxidermy http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,387077.0.html
    set a tone that indicated here that many taxidermists on this site aren’t open to change.

    This is new wave of using taxidermy in art exhibits, and also posting on various social media platforms has made more of an impact than many here may know. Some people on the taxidermy.net follow these new artists and work with some of them, albeit not necessarily the true rogue crew. The followers of this new wave of taxidermy and art are huge, and herein I will mention a few that I do watch via the web. I don’t believe I am not a follower of these sites because I never click “follow” since I don’t have an account on instagram or twitter, and although I have been registered on facebook for 9 years, I only ever posted one time.

    Sarina Brewer, of Minnesota at https://www.instagram.com/i_am_rogue_taxidermy/ has 12,300 followers and was one of the founding members of the Rogue Taxidermy movement. She has a Bachelor in Fine Arts from the Minneapolis College of Art & Design. Explore her instagram account and web page and you will see taxidermy “art”. She did spend time at the Bell Museum and has some training.

    Becca Barnett of South Carolina https://www.instagram.com/beccabarnet/?hl=en
    Also has 12,300 followers. She has a Bachelor in Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2009 (BFA in illustration). Becca attended the Missouri Taxidermy Institute and spent some time working at the AMNH in New York but now is working on a complete renovation/re-design of the Charleston Museum's Natural History Hall, scheduled to open early 2018.

    Mickey Alice Kwapis of Chicago https://www.instagram.com/mickeyalicekwapis/
    has 13,200 followers. I am not sure what training she has in college but she is very articulate and writes some great blog articles. She is one of a new breed who travels the US (and even world) teaching taxidermy to the masses. The various museums she has taught classes to the public is impressive – being invited to Harvard twice. I had the pleasure of meeting her at the NTA in Pennsylvania and spent some time talking with her.

    Katie Innamorato of New York has a Bachelors of Fine Art and Sculpture from the State University at New Paltz, New York. She used to have an instagram account with over 10,000 followers that was open but like many of the rogue taxidermist types, had to deal with people who did not like her work and I believe she closed it down because of feedback. Her resume includes many art exhibits, but she attended the NJ taxidermists shows, and recently Hew England, and has been in the press many times. http://afterlifeanatomy.com/pages/cv She also teaches classes on taxidermy around the US.

    Divya Anantharaman also of New York https://www.instagram.com/bloodyberrylicious/ has 10,200 followers. She graduated with a Bachelors of Fine Art from the Pratt Institute and works designing shoes and other things. She turned to taxidermy and like Katie above, works as Taxidermists/Artist residents at the Morbid Anatomy Museum. Divya and Katie are working on a book on taxidermy or art or something like that to be published in the fall.

    Dakotah Gould of Iowa goes by Dakotahrose https://www.instagram.com/dakotahrose/ has 7777 followers already though she has only been doing taxidermy a short while. She spent some time training with some other taxidermist and recently spent some time doing Natural History exhibits at the State Historical Museum in Des Moines Iowa.

    Allis Markham, whom most people know well on this site has an instagram account here https://www.instagram.com/allis/?hl=en she has only 5578 followers though her twitter and Facebook pages may have additional people looking at her work. She also trained in a taxidermy school but then spent a few years with Tim Bovard at the Los Angeles Natural History Museum. Futher training she got from working with outstanding taxidermists like Tony Finazzo, Danny Owens and Ken Walker. Prey Taxidermy has some other very talented people working there including Jennifer Hall currently working towards a Masters at Johns Hopkins. She is very talented in art as can be seen on her twitter page https://twitter.com/artandevolution

    I am not sure how these artists develop a great following, but there are many great female taxidermists that don’t quite garner the attention they deserve – for example Alicia Goode at https://www.instagram.com/__wunderkammer__/
    She started college in Zoology and then went towards a degree in fine art but a great job landed in her lap and she never looked back. She has worked the California Academy of Sciences, done work for the AMNH, but is currently at the Oakland Museum of California

    There are many other taxidermists, also female, who have similar art/taxidermy sites outside the US. For example Daniëlle Frenken of the Netherlands who does some fine work in sculpture, flat art and taxidermy https://www.instagram.com/daniellefrenken_taxidermy_art/
    Polly Morgan of England has had dozens of unique taxidermy pieces as a merge of taxidermy and art. See the list of exhibitions here http://pollymorgan.co.uk/exhibitions/

    I think this new breed of taxidermy is very interesting and at the same time disturbing, but am open to change. Many of these people think outside the box, heck their thinking isn’t just outside the box but outside the building.

    I wasn’t sure I should publicize these people but it does give a perspective on taxidermy and art. The Taxidermy.net has 47040 registered members and is undoubtedly the largest taxidermy site in the world. How many “followers” it has is a great question, but the art and press and approach of many of these ladies does give me a view of taxidermy and what can be done with it.
     
  2. Allie

    Allie Active Member

    334
    31
    Thanks for another thoughtful and informative post, Steve. This is something I've pondered for a long time, the future of taxidermy as art is being guided mostly by women who come from a different background and training than most "traditional" taxidermists. I've been struggling to figure out how to elucidate this fact in Big Fur, while staying on topic.
     

  3. michael p.

    michael p. Getting better with age :)

    There's room for everybody and I feel the competitive spirit between both the more traditional taxidermist and the more new age taxidermist will push both into creating the ultimate mount to wow or even earn the respect of their opposition who has/had a different view and opinion of how taxidermy should be presented. In the end both will push both to create stronger and better pieces........ it's a win-win..
     
  4. Joe Kish

    Joe Kish Well-Known Member

    870
    1,882
    Texas
    PA, (Stephen),
    Now we’re getting somewhere. Most enlighening. All this time I was under the false illusion that there were no fine arts degreed people active in this field. (More on that later.) I very much like the turn this topic has taken because of posters like you, Roof and Janelli who are providing solid information, guidance and mature plain old fashioned balance and sanity to both my posts.

    Obviously those of us not on facebook or simply unacquainted with other art movements simply aren’t aware how taxidermy has been melding itself into the work of a whole different breed of artists and artisans.

    Movements and “schools” in the various arts come and go and they often bring something new and valuable without superseding what went before. I’m old school of course. For those of limited knowledge of art history, I’m referring to movements led by the Mannerists, the Realists, the Impressionists, etc. Whether or not these new stylists employing taxidermy in their work will produce works of lasting beauty and value remains to be seen. Only us old guys remember the “grotesqueries” popular in the early 20th century or the novelties common in the 40s and beyond of squirrels playing cards, cats playing the fiddle, and much worse. Ya’ll remember Ramboar the pig?

    These new movements are likely the result of the popularization of the art itself from the attention drawn to taxidermy from the WTC shows especially. I’m referring to all the productions crews who have made documentaries about the art and taxidermist themselves, the upsurge in books on the subject and even the spawning of a television show starring Russell Knight. Who would have ever thought that would happen? Or Dante making National Geographic?!

    Lots of books well worth reading have been published in the last several years on the history of the art even for the commercial guys. (I’m talking to the readers here, not to you Steve) Such as several on Akeley himself and one of my favorites, Still Life – Adventures In Taxidermy by Melissa Milgrom . It’s full of recent insider stories of contemporary taxidermists like John Matthews at the Smithsonian, “panda forger” Ken Walker and a “wildly unconventional “ artist/sculptress, an English taxidermist, Emily Mayer. The book is a must read.

    I’d like to mention too, the common denominator of nearly every accomplished artist in any field you can name and that is they have solid training and mentoring plus a working knowledge of the history and background of their chosen field. For instance if you’re a sculptor and never even set foot inside a museum of art, you can’t know what great sculpture is. In our field too few taxidermists have ever set foot inside a natural history museum and saw with their own eyes the works of the masters in this field. They have no timeless standard against which to measure great work except what they see at a competition. Notwithstanding the fact that competitions are still the one place to see the absolutely finest taxidermy work under one roof outside of a big city museum. Admittedly competitions made it happen. And when I hear a taxidermist say “I know what I like.” Invariably I hear him actually saying he likes what he knows.

    In closing, I’m happy to report my latest discovery of a genuine old school taxidermist, with a bona fide fine arts degree, which I never knew before today. He’s the one and only GEORGE DANTE! George is the real McCoy, credentialed from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. He was mentored by professors of national fame. George would be the perfect choice to give a class on the fundamentals of art theory and practice at next year’s WTC convention. And what an expert judge he would be! All in favor of recruiting George Dante, send an email to Larry and if he doesn’t recruit George for next year’s show threaten never to walk his dog or pet his cat ever again!







    PA, (Stephen),
    Now we’re getting somewhere. Most enlighening. All this time I was under the false illusion that there were no fine arts degreed people active in this field. (More on that later.) I very much like the turn this topic has taken because of posters like you, Roof and Janelli who are providing solid information, guidance and mature plain old fashioned balance and sanity to both my posts.
    Obviously those of us not on facebook or simply unacquainted with other art movements simply aren’t aware how taxidermy has been melding itself into the work of a whole different breed of artists and artisans.
    Movements and “schools” in the various arts come and go and they often bring something new and valuable without superseding what went before. I’m old school of course. For those of limited knowledge of art history, I’m referring to movements led by the Mannerists, the Realists, the Impressionists, etc. Whether or not these new stylists employing taxidermy in their work will produce works of lasting beauty and value remains to be seen. Only us old guys remember the “grotesqueries” popular in the early 20th century or the novelties common in the 40s and beyond of squirrels playing cards, cats playing the fiddle, and much worse. Ya’ll remember Ramboar the pig?
    These new movements are likely the result of the popularization of the art itself from the attention drawn to taxidermy from the WTC shows especially. I’m referring to all the productions crews who have made documentaries about the art and taxidermist themselves, the upsurge in books on the subject and even the spawning of a television show starring Russell Knight. Who would have ever thought that would happen? Or Dante making National Geographic?!
    Lots of books well worth reading have been published in the last several years on the history of the art even for the commercial guys. (I’m talking to the readers here, not to you Steve) Such as several on Akeley himself and one of my favorites, Still Life – Adventures In Taxidermy by Melissa Milgrom . It’s full of recent insider stories of contemporary taxidermists like John Matthews at the Smithsonian, “panda forger” Ken Walker and a “wildly unconventional “ artist/sculptress, an English taxidermist, Emily Mayer. The book is a must read.
    I’d like to mention too, the common denominator of nearly every accomplished artist in any field you can name and that is they have solid training and mentoring plus a working knowledge of the history and background of their chosen field. For instance if you’re a sculptor and never even set foot inside a museum of art, you can’t know what great sculpture is. In our field too few taxidermists have ever set foot inside a natural history museum and saw with their own eyes the works of the masters in this field. They have no timeless standard against which to measure great work except what they see at a competition. Notwithstanding the fact that competitions are still the one place to see the absolutely finest taxidermy work under one roof outside of a big city museum. (Admittedly competitions made it happen.
    And when I hear a taxidermist say “I know what I like.” Invariably I hear him actually saying he likes what he knows.
    In closing, I’m happy to report my latest discovery of a genuine old school taxidermist, with a bona fide fine arts degree, which I never knew before today. He’s the one and only GEORGE DANTE! George is the real McCoy, credentialed from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. He was mentored by professors of national fame. George would be the perfect choice to give a class on the fundamentals of art theory and practice at next year’s WTC convention. And what an expert judge he would be! All in favor of recruiting George Dante, send an email to Larry and if he doesn’t recruit George for next year’s show threaten never to walk his dog or pet his cat ever again!
     
  5. michael p.

    michael p. Getting better with age :)

    "In closing, I’m happy to report my latest discovery of a genuine old school taxidermist, with a bona fide fine arts degree, which I never knew before today. He’s the one and only GEORGE DANTE! "


    Your latest discovery??? What damn rock have you been hiding under??? Naw, we know you're just joking when you said that. We've also been admiring George for his achievements and talent for years. Your latest discovery........ you do have a way of cracking me up. That would be like somebody walking up to me and sayings "I just found out how good this band Foo Fighters are and they write their own music, you should check them out! ;D :mad: ;D

    "Your latest discovery"!!!!! Bah, hah, hah, hah!!!!!!!! That's is awesome!! You really almost had us believing that you were over 15 years behind the rest of the industry. You really are a genius in your writings!!!

    You're a hoot Joe, that's why we love ya!!!
     
  6. furtanshop

    furtanshop New Member

    49
    2
    Now, I would like to hear from Mr. Dante why he would or would not accept judging at the so called world show.

    For this to be a ground breaking event the shows and Assoc would have to make significant changes .

    The general public has an interest in how we do this , but they do not give a rats ass who does it
     
  7. Joe Kish

    Joe Kish Well-Known Member

    870
    1,882
    Texas
    I freely admit I'm not as entertaining as you Mike. But with over 25 thousand postings you obviously work hard at it.

    Anytime a reader doesn't understand what a writer intended to say, it's the fault of the WRITER - NOT THE READER!

    I should have dropped the comma after the word 'taxidermist' and emphasized the words - WITH A bona fide FINE ARTS DEGREE. I think that's quite rare.

    When I spent an afternoon with George at his studio two years ago, the fact never came up. There's also a lot more things that I'm discovering for the first time about the people and their view points in this art/craft/industry by way of this forum, which I never knew before. I hope everyone else is too. People are not always who or what they appear to be.

    Remember I said: Whenever you put your work before a public audience, you're fair game for praise AND criticism? I consider it a mark of distinction that I provide you (and others) with a good target to practice your comedic criticism. I know you love doing it so don't stop. But don't give up your day job.

    And by the way... it's obvious to everyone by now that I'm an amateur on the mechanics of posting on this forum. It makes me look dumb, but it doesn't make me a bad person.
     
  8. furtanshop

    furtanshop New Member

    49
    2
    Joe, Please do not sell yourself short

    You have created a bit of a new spark in me. I just do not know what direction I will go at this time.

    I remember the early days of Taxidermy Review and have always wanted to here your views.
     
  9. oldboar

    oldboar Taxidermy...do the impossible:)

    726
    1
    I love the stirring of the pot :)

    But pure and simple… I think somebody having a "art background, or a degree means absolutely freaking nothing to this conversation. Absolutely nothing.

    You will find just as many people winning a WASCO award with no training…..than those with training.

    My reasoning is this, they see nature through eyes that are different,,,, taxidermist are different people. Consider that statement we are unique, in our medium is so very different… That I believe a very good taxidermist Will win the artistic merit award nine times out of 10 simply because of our understanding of the animal and anatomy and knowledge based on that pure and simple. Not always focused on what the audience likes that is different… My opinion :)
     
  10. KatieC

    KatieC Active Member

    It's still taught. You generally start out with the basics of learning drawing, painting, sculpture, any other area you choose to study, along with composition and design. I found all of this extremely useful and think it would benefit any taxidermist. Once you get more advanced, you may end up in the more weird artsy stuff, where things seemed to me mostly about concepts and being able to talk about your work. I wouldn't have been able to do wildlife art sculpture in my sculpture classes just because that's what I liked. I did what I had to do to get my degree, but didn't go on to get a BFA or Masters, because I'm just not very good at making stuff that fits with what contemporary art is these days. I do like to learn and see what others are doing in that area. But I love doing taxidermy and other more realistic animal art, or even some fantasy stuff. I'll do a little bit of the weird stuff just for fun, but I can't take it too seriously.

    If anyone is curious the type of contemporary artwork I'm talking about, check into this magazine: http://sculpture.org/redesign/mag.shtml

    I would love to see traditional taxidermy get the respect I think it deserves in the art world. Well done realistic taxidermy is absolutely a fine art. Unfortunately, the contemporary art world isn't interested in anything that isn't weird conceptual stuff right now. Who knows if or when that might change. There are a lot of young people interested in taxidermy these days, which is great! Even the rogue stuff, which I don't care for as much.
     
  11. Jerry Huffaker

    Jerry Huffaker Well-Known Member

    2,496
    309
    Having a fine arts degree has nothing to do with being a fine artist

    no more than being highly educated has anything to do with intelligence.

    Its not the degree or the level of education, its the individual and how he or she applies it.
     
  12. Carolin Brak-Dolny

    Carolin Brak-Dolny Active Member

    172
    65
    There is a painting called "The voice of fire" by American Barrett Newman. It is about 200 x 90 inches. It is divided into three equal vertical stripes. The two outside ones are dark blue and the middle one is red.

    Our Canadian government paid 1.8 million dollars for this and put it in our national art gallery in Ottawa.

    To me it is just stupid......a true example of the "emperor has no clothes"

    But some idiot thought the government should pay 1.8 million for it. So I find this debate about what is artistic and if you need an art degree just as stupid.
    Because I am sure the person who said the government should buy the ridiculous painting also had an art degree.

    Joe you may wish the judges had an art degree but what if they like stupid paintings like "The voice of fire"?

    I believe art is a personal thing. I may like something and you may not.

    But I believe there is a common thread in all good art , It may be pleasing or revolting. It has to stir some emotion. A study of composition is helpful and it may make your mount more pleasing, not that it will win a WASCO award but it may just give you that one extra point that will boost you above everyone else.

    One thing I would like (wish list) is that at the next world show not all the mounts are crammed together. ( I know due to limited space and number of mounts this may be impossible.)They then for sure lose their artistic impact. I remember Kent Reedy's duck on a stick with the reflecting carved duck. It was set alone in the hall where the collective artists are. It really had an impact on me and many others. I think that if it were jammed in around others it would have lost that initial impact.

    If you have ever been to an art gallery you will notice that there is a great deal of space between each exhibit.
     
  13. Jerry Huffaker

    Jerry Huffaker Well-Known Member

    2,496
    309
    I know that Larry has a hard time finding a facility that can handle all the pieces at such a huge show but I agree with you here. When a piece stands alone with a little space around it , it gives you a completely different perspective. Just look at how different the mounts look in Ken's photographs compared to how they look in the show room. It is difficult job setting up a competition room.
     
  14. Amy

    Amy Mammal artist

    I couldn't agree with you more, Jerry. George Dante is one heck of a talented individual, and that is not due primarily to his art degree; to imply that it is, is a discredit to his talents I feel. George would be a great judge, but I would have thought that even before the discovery of these credentials. This thread reads as if he was thought to be just a run of the mill individual, trudging through the daily taxidermy work but after this discovery.. This changes it ALL!

    Some people either have it, or they don't. Great technique can be learned, whether it be artistic composition or basic taxidermy techniques, but some people excel beyond others. There are individuals out there that have been in this industry for decades and decades and just cannot seem to apply proper technique, while it is amazing to see some individuals blossom in taxidermy and become very proficient at it within a mere year or two of starting. Thats where I say, some have it and some don't. If only formal training were the key to it all! I bet you could ask Mr Fleming or Mr Krane - do ALL the students that take their excellent taxidermy classes go on to be masters? No. Not due to lack of good training, but due to lack of other things, be that initiative, business skills, or just plain ole lack of raw talent.

    A successful taxidermist is the combination of many things.
     
  15. PA

    PA Well-Known Member

    1,641
    1,792
    The reason I started this separate thread wasn't to imply that a degree in fine art gave any advantage to someone entering a competition, but simply to point out that many of the new practitioners of taxidermy do have a degree like that. If you spend time looking at the various instagram, twitter and websites of these people you will find a passion for taxidermy that is quite interesting. I never rose to that level of passion. But most couldn't hold a candle to the work you put out Amy.

    Art is indeed in the eyes of the beholder and that is why choosing good judges is so critical. Larry chooses his own since it is his convention, and petitioning to have a judge does no good. If Larry judged the competition like the show Immortalized I don't think it would be as popular as it is. Here Beth Beverly, one of the judges of that show, gives her two cents on judging http://articles.philly.com/2016-05-14/entertainment/73067123_1_good-taxidermy-diamond-tooth-taxidermy-beth-beverly

    There was a big discussion on a pig on a stick - how do you think a floating elephant would fair at the world show
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Amy

    Amy Mammal artist

    I realize that, Steven - I didn't mean to deviate from the original post. My post was in relation to some of the things Mr Kish brought up further into this thread. Sorry to have swayed off topic.

    There is definitely a new breed of taxidermists. Not just in gender..although there *are* so many more women involved than when I got started 16 years ago. Or perhaps there were more back then than I realized, but these social media platforms make it more obvious now. I wasn't aware of some of these that you posted about, so I appreciate you sharing the links! Im Instagram-illiterate... I can only handle so many types of social media and Facebook is plenty on most days. Lol
     
  17. Allie

    Allie Active Member

    334
    31
    I can relate to the social media overload, Amy. There is only so much time in the day and of course there's this darn forum!

    Not to hijack your thread, Steve, but I'm curious what others think...

    PA stated the facts: a lot of the new, innovative taxidermy becoming popular in the art world and in general (among the public, not necessarily taxidermists, as evidenced by their number of followers and lack of familiarity here on the forum) is being done by young women who typically have formal training in fine art. While some of these ladies (and there are certainly some men among them, but they are a minority) are rooted deeply in the art of taxidermy and even natural history, some of them are sculptors who tend to incorporate taxidermy, for whatever reason. [Side note, somewhat relevant – I have a friend who is a very good and successful sculptor who works in clay. Do not call her a potter, unless you want to piss her off! And she doesn't want to be called a ceramicist, either. When I asked her what the hell are you, then? She replied, "I'm a sculptor whose preferred medium is clay." I give her grief about this all the time and like to introduce her to people that way. And I always joke with her that I'm a sculptor whose preferred medium is roadkill.]

    Instead of hearing why you might discredit them or their art, why do you suppose there is this renewed interest in taxidermy and why has it been spreading into the art world?
    Why is it being done predominantly by young ladies?
    How do you think this impacts the public's perception of the craft of taxidermy and the profession of commercial taxidermists?
    Where do you think this is leading?
    Will we continue to see more taxidermy incorporated into fine art (work displayed in galleries and museums)?
    If so, is that a good thing?

    I have my own theories, but I'm no taxidermist, I just hang out with a lot of them. I'm very interested to hear your opinions.
     
  18. Carolin Brak-Dolny

    Carolin Brak-Dolny Active Member

    172
    65
    Rogue taxidermy is not a new concept, just some new people finding it interesting. Why the young ladies? Maybe it is like dressing dolls. ha ha I can see them rolling their eyes. lol

    If some fashion designer takes a fancy to it, it will even become more popular. It seems more of an urban thing. It is a fad that will come and go like most fashion.

    Commercial taxidermy will stay as long as there are hunters.

    I have made a beaver into an angry mascot, standing on two legs like a cartoon character, holding an ax. It was to be a gift from the Canadian military to the Aussie military. As long as I get paid I do not have a problem with it.
     
  19. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,514
    2,628
    MN
    Allie, were those questions posed only towards PA? If so, I apologize. Please allow me to try to answer them.
    First, I'm not sure why there is a renewed interest in taxidermy, other than trends seem to come and go, there are often some that continue to find their way back and this is one of those.
    Second, taxidermy has always pretty much been a male dominated art, and women have as of the late been driven to prove that, if men can do it so can they. There is the the underlying hint of it being taboo, not only by the general public but also with many of the old school minded taxidermists. This fact adds appeal for many who were neither for or against taxidermy. This also plays into the third question of "How this impacts the public's perception of the craft of taxidermy and the profession of commercial taxidermist?" With the added appeal I mentioned, and the fact that women, who may not be in taxidermy as a business geared towards the hunting and fishing public and all the testosterone fueled hoopla that goes with it, are the practitioners, if you will, of the craft/art of taxidermy, there is a more inviting door opened for people who have an interest in what taxidermy is all about but were intimidated. I'm not sure it has any other impact on "Commercial taxidermists" other than maybe softening some folk's negative impression of their trade. That in itself can be a big impact. It is possible that techniques could be invented by any one of these new taxidermists, that could help commercial folks.
    Forth and fifth, Where is this leading? In some circles it will last for a while but I'm not sure the general public will be so accepting, so I see it as still just a fad that will fade.
     
  20. Allie

    Allie Active Member

    334
    31
    Thanks, 3bears. Those questions were directed at everyone, I'm interested in their opinions about the subject and have been for some time.

    Sure, we can say it's a fad and may come and go. But things come into fashion for a reason. It may be because of Oprah or Martha or Kanye (i.e., a celebrity endorsement), but I suspect there is something deeper going on that is causing this interest.