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Rotocast replica

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by Off the Hook, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. Does anybody have a good way to attach a Rotocast replica to a piece of driftwood? I know to pre-drill small holes and use a little bigger screw is what I was told but I was wondering if this works very well or if maybe someone else does it different. Especially if you need space between the replica and the piece of driftwood so your fins on the non show side have some room. Thanks for any tips.
     
  2. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    You got the way to attach correctly. I usually put in 5 or 6 screws on big muskie reps because the weight scares me. With driftwood, I usually don't need a spacer to clear any fins as I find a piece of driftwood that doesn't have branches in the way and the thickness of the driftwood is almost always enough. The situation where I'll sometimes need a spacer is when I attach the replica to a hardwood panel. Then, I'll add the required sized spacer block between the panel and fish to push the fish out a bit to clear any fins. I'll paint the block black to clean it up a bit but you can't see it anyway but it's a nice touch IMO. There's nothing worse IMO than mounting a fish with the back side pelvic and pecs if applicable shooting straight down to clear the panel or wall!!!
     

  3. fishmaster

    fishmaster Well-Known Member

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    You can also use two dowel rods. Drill the holes, cut the dowels the same length. Put the fish show side down and try to level up as much as possible. Mix up a small amount of pour foam and dump in the holes. Slide dowels in and then flip the fish over with dowels down and rest the ends of the dowels on a table top. This will make the foam run down to the area where the holes were drilled and will foam around them. Make sure dowels are parallel to each other before the foam sets. It's a good idea to also drill a vent hole so the expanding gas has a place to go. I usually drill a small hole when the anus would be. I'm not a big fan of attaching fish to driftwood using dowels but this is the best solution I've found to the "no block" issue.
     
  4. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Dowels in a replica? Especially some of those heavier ones???
     
  5. I have used the method mentioned above with the dowel rods but I use metal all thread. Bend it into an L shape so there's rod running the length of the fish on the inside. Once set drill your drift wood and attach with a nut.
     
  6. Thanks all for the ideas. I did get it attached using screws and countersunk the holes in the driftwood. Seems to be pretty darn solid. I might try the dowel thing sometime though. Thanks again guys I appreciate it.
     
  7. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Threaded rods is one thing
    Then you use a threaded rod, not a "dowel" rod! Here's a great example of using the correct terminology to communicate properly - lol! Dowel rods and threaded rods = two totally different animals and two totally different attachment methods. Fishmaster sounds like he's just using wooden dowels in a replica??? In which case, I contend that is a lot of work for what inevitably is a much weaker attachment vs. screws...
     
  8. JL

    JL Taxidermist for 64 years

    I'm pretty old school when it comes to this stuff. Whenever there was no attachment block in the fish ( maybe someone forgot to put one in the fish....it has happened to me before) I just dremel out an opening in the wall side of the fish large enough for me to fit a block that will just barely fit inside on the top to bottom but still grab two edges of the fish lengthwise. I keep the cutout to be placed later. I put two gobs of Bondo on the mounting block and slide it into place making sure the Bondo spreads well onto the edges of the opening. TIP...place two drywall screws in the center of the block to maneuver it around without losing it.When the Bondo dries I remove the two screws and slather Bondo on the cutout and put it back on the fish where it was removed. A little finish work at the cutout seams and there you have it. Just my way of doing it....works for me. Good luck...JL
     
  9. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    JL, in the poster's example it's a Rotocast replica. Not a replica that a block was forgotten to get inserted into. I don't know about the other distributors, but I spoke to John at LCR about this a long time ago. And he stated that the material they use is meant to hold screws. (I got it in writing in an email just in case one detaches and falls off a wall - lol!)
     
  10. Sorry FishArt. If you read my post again you will see that I stated I HAVE used the dowel rod method. Then I went onto stating that I use threaded rod. Never mentioned that they were the same thing.
     
  11. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    And if you read my post - albeit a little confusing with the multiple quotes, you'd realize that I wasn't directing my comments towards you Jamie. You were quite clear in your post that you were using threaded rods...
     
  12. rogerswildlife

    rogerswildlife Rogers Wildlife Taxidermy Tommy Rogers

    I use steal mushroom head toggle bolts .you can get them at any home depot .they are for anchoring things in sheet rock .They come in many different sizes. Drill a hole in the repo just big enough to get the spring loaded end in .When you put the bolt through you driftwood attach the spring loaded end on and push it through the hole in the fish . It opens up when you tighten it up .
    Tommy
     
  13. I started making my own mounting hardware last year. I braze these up on threaded and unthreaded rods. Cheap and if I use ¼" rod I can hold up.....well a 7' alligator gar!

    [​IMG]
     
  14. fishmaster

    fishmaster Well-Known Member

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    A footnote- I mentioned using pour foam in the previous post. What I failed to state is that I'm using 15lb pour foam. It does not expand nearly as much as the typical 3-4lb deadhead foam and has incredible adhesion. You will not pull the dowels out of the fish. Two 1/2" wooden dowels will support about any size replica. I use screws if there is a wooden block in the back of the replica. If there is not a block or if I decide to use the reverse side of a standard replica so there is no block, the dowel method can be done in 5 min. I never use dowels unless I don't have any other good options.
     
  15. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    You're probably fine, but I wouldn't 100% trust two 1/2" dowels in a 50" LCR musky, but that's just me.

    I guess it's the "different strokes" thing going on here, but sorry I just don't get it! I'm just curious WHY people are trying to reinvent the wheel? And a SLOWER wheel at that - lol! Of all the attachment methods listed (without any concerns that the material in the replica won't hold), screws are clearly the strongest material AND the cheapest and easiest to install. 5 minutes and I'm done. I must be missing something here???
     
  16. fishmaster

    fishmaster Well-Known Member

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    Marty, Maybe I'm missing to point too. The question was how to attach a rotocast fish that didn't have a block molded inside. If it had a block I'd use screws too but since it doesn't have a block do you feel drywall screws adequate to attach a 50lb muskie (which from a certain supplier will weigh 48lbs). You are talking about 1/4" maximum thickness of un-reinforced crappy urethane. If it had a block inside, sure! Without a block hell no, especially if I have to ship the fish. Somebody here is missing the point of the question.
     
  17. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    I think you must have missed my previous post about LCR. When we talk rotocast we're pretty much talking LCR. I believe the only other Rotocast blanks are the 3D Arps maybe? (Arps have a piece of wood centered though I think?) Anywho, as mentioned in my previous post I spoke to John at LCR about the weight (and strength) of their blanks. I can't recall the exact conversation but he has assured me that the material they use has been tested and is plenty strong to hold screws. Their blanks certainly aren't urethane. And I use a redundancy of about 5-6 screws staggered up and down and side to side on their big muskies. BTW the strength of their material info is coming directly from the horses mouth and I do have an email from John documenting the claims. In fact, IMO they are pretty much the blanks of choice if you're going to get in on a Bass Pro bid with purchased blanks because BPS wants all pedestals. Makes things a lot easier...
     
  18. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the blank and the final desired outcome a piece of wood can be installed into a blank without one. It isn't that difficult, you just have to think outside the box a bit early in the process. You could also reinforce the back with added epoxy poured into it and left to cure inside the blank. Or use toggle bolts, but be careful when tightening them down.