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Skinning Bobcats

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Appalachia, Oct 2, 2016.

  1. Appalachia

    Appalachia New Member

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    Do you guys prefer to make the slit up the back or up the belly on life-size bobcat mounts? Fixing to start on my first one. Also any tips or tricks would be appreciated as well. Thanks
     
  2. I would dorsal skin (split down the back) the cat, this makes it easier to get it on the form.
     

  3. Appalachia

    Appalachia New Member

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    Thanks for the reply that's what I ended up doing. What method do you use for the feet and pads? I don't wanna mess them up. I've seen where people either split them or cut around them? Do you just split the leg and pad and try to keep the pad on the skin?
     
  4. Amy

    Amy Mammal artist

    I have no problem tubing out the feet. No incision needed. This only works with felines. Coyote, fox and the like do require a relief cut.
     
  5. Appalachia

    Appalachia New Member

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    This cat has previously been frozen for a long time, and I just can't get them to budge, I am just past the trigger toe and it just won't budge....don't want to rip it. Any suggestions? Thanks for the replies.
     
  6. ljones

    ljones 1994 wasco award winner

    If its freezer burn inject the foot with water and let it set a while then continue. Skinning
     
  7. Appalachia

    Appalachia New Member

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    I think that's what happened, because I pulled pretty hard and the whole back foot skin broke off....maybe do a shoulder mount on it. Thanks guys!
     
  8. Cole

    Cole Amateur Taxidermist

    For the record, I would NOT dorsal cut a bobcat. Ventral is a much better option for cats.
     
  9. Amy

    Amy Mammal artist

    Cole, I guess it depends on the fur length of the cat? In my (personal) opinion, dorsal is so much easier to work with. I hate working with a ventral or cased skin!! BUT I don't think dorsal would be the way to go with a very short haired, slick cat. Or if someone isn't good at nice, tight stitching.
     
  10. Cole

    Cole Amateur Taxidermist

    I must not be good at nice tight stitching. If a bobcat has been dorsal skinned I can usually tell by looking, and if I can tell by looking...that's a problem. I can mount either in about the same amount of time, but I've had plenty of practice. It probably did take me a little longer when I first started.
     
  11. woakley144

    woakley144 Active Member

    Go to youtube.com and search Brian Hendricks taxidermy, Pickle to thaw. He has made some FREE videos on how to skin a bobcat. I used the method and really liked it! and there will be minimal sewing when I mount.