1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Help with pricing my first commisson piece

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Libitina, Oct 26, 2016.

  1. I've been doing very small animal taxidermy for just under a year now and recently trained with Amy Carter in NC to do a small mammal class. I have someone inquiring about me doing a fisher cat for them, which would be my first taxidermy for a customer. I'm having trouble figuring out what I should charge. I don't want to charge as much as experienced taxidermists do because I am so new, but I want to charge accordingly. Also, how do you charge customers? Do they pay a certain amount up front, to cover the costs of the materials, and then the rest later?

    Any advice is greatly appreciated!!

    Thank!
    Nikki
     
  2. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    My suggestion is this, If you are going to charge for taxidermy, business classes are just a important as mounting classes. You have to figure out everything that it takes to run your shop and to be a taxidermist for a year including a percentage for profit and wages and then reduce it down to an hourly rate. This is shop rate per hour. Add this to supplies and number of hours it takes to mount it. That is about how much you should charge.
     

  3. Steve.J

    Steve.J Member

    First off, what you charge should have nothing to do with your experience. But should have everything to do with cost of materials and supplies, what it takes to run your shop (overhead), and most importantly how you value your time. That's where folks short change themselves from the beginning and can never dig out of the hole to make their business profitable.
    Do some research online on prices other taxidermists around you charge and don't be afraid to charge as much or a little more for your work.
    And yes, you should strongly consider a 50% deposit payment before any work is done or supplies ordered. Tends to weed out non-pickups and helps cash flow.