1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Concened about tanned antelope cape

Discussion in 'Deer and Gameheads' started by boone90, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. boone90

    boone90 Dan Hastings

    I got 3 antelope capes back from the tannery (which has turned out to be a little less than reputable) 2 of which were totally unmountable with large bald spots. 1 looked to be fine but I just thawed it again and washed it in water and dawn in preperation for mounting and was a little surprised at the amount of hair that slipped out. It did not come out in patches but I ended up with a substantial handful of hair when I was done. The big question from this coastal BC boy who doesn't run into a lot of antelope is how concerned should I be? It ia clear that they are prone to some hair loss but how much is typical? I am going to try and treat this like a pin feathered bird with minimal handling and grooming, I guess I want to know if I am wasting my time or if I am working with a commonly overcome situation?
     
  2. Thats your problem you washed the pronghorn. duh. YOU cant wash pronghorn, they are not durable as such. Don;t blame the tannery if you salted the proghorn and did not keep the hide out of the pool of body fluids, thats the first step in the hide slipping.

    QUOTE looked to be fine but I just thawed it again and washed it in water and dawn in preperation for mounting and was a little surprised at the amount of hair that slipped out.

    Read here, search here about pronghorn.
     

  3. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,187
    2,022
    MN
    Pronghorns lose hair just by you thinking about them. Back up here and we might be able to figure this out. How long after death were they skinned and cooled, what were the temps at the time? How did you handle and flesh them. Did you slat them with fresh salt? Did you get them dry? I
    I'm in MN and have received speedgoats killed the first day of the season out in western states, as we don't have them here, that were just skinned and put in coolers with ice. The ice melted by the time they made it back here after their hunts, and the capes were soaked. They tanned and mounted up fine. My process is apply stop rot liberally, let that work for a short time, turn everything cut large chunks of red meat and fat off, don't beam them. Salt let sit for 24 hours, shake off salt and reapply for 24 hours then hang til dry. Box and send to tannery.
     
  4. boone90

    boone90 Dan Hastings

    Mr John C excuse my ignorance, I am not impressed with the tannery for their poor shaving, shaving cuts and the fact that the hair was filthy, oily and full of chunks of flesh and particulates which needed to be washed out and the fact that I paid paid full price and had to dicover the slippage on my own was not impressive. As for the handling of the capes, we harvested them on a guided hunt where the whole animals were dropped at the outfitters taxidermist (not my preference but when the hunt is paid for by family and they are friends with the outfitter you have to go with the flow a bit). They weren't salted by him, but instead sloppily skinned and frozen, then driven half way across the states, then shipped to Canada at which point I took them to the tannery for turn and salt service as I have yet to aquire the tools and supplies to do the job correctly as I am new to mammals. I used the search function to the best of my ability and didn't find what I was after so I posted. I don't care for being thought of as an idiot as a result of inexperience and your lack of pertinent information to make such an assessment, if you can't say it nicely please reserve your criticism in the future. 3bears I thank you and I think that the first half of this post should outline the nature of how the capes were handled (less than optimal). I am going to go for it and I will update later on how it went.
     
  5. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,187
    2,022
    MN
    You know now that I think about it I had one antelope that had slippage issues but, what is strange is it was killed Oct 1 and hung in a walk in cooler within the hour after death. I think with speed goats the key is to get them skinned asap and let that body heat dissipate from the flesh side as well. That doesn't happen when it is hung in a cooler prior to skinning. Good luck
     
  6. boone90

    boone90 Dan Hastings

    I think that was the case exactly, the outfitter was lazy and farmed out the task of caping....$85.00 and the lips, eyes, nose and ears weren't even turned....talk about hozing tourists. Live and learn, I will do it myself from now on whether it's the staus quo or not. The cape is now in the trash, now I need to find 3 new ones...not so easy in Canada sigh. Betweem import fees and tanning that's a $1000 in the trash.
     
  7. Not uncommon to get a bunch of single hairs falling out. Handfuls are a problem if it's all at the same time.
     
  8. boone90

    boone90 Dan Hastings

    It started as singles and then the clumps started falling out, I considered poceeding and possibly repairing a few areas and then large portions of the facial hair fell out in clumps and I said to heck with it. Not going to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.
     
  9. TIMBUCK

    TIMBUCK Active Member

    The only way to wash a greasy, oily pronghorn as after is has been mounted and dried for 3-4 weeks and even then do it VERY gently. I hate jacking with those things....
     
  10. once salted, very hard to freeze the cape. I HATE PRE SALTED CAPES