1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Wrinkle detail in skin

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Rick Slife, Feb 10, 2017.

  1. Rick Slife

    Rick Slife Member

    35
    2
    I'm having a hard time getting "wrinkles" or "skin folds" detail on my deer. What I'm talking about is the area on the neck where the skin should show wrinkles when his neck is turned. I've made the detail in the form deeper and thinned the hide in that area but still can't seem to get a it. I've also tried building the creases up with clay. All I end up with is hair that doesn't lay right and no appearance wrinkles in the skin. ..... anyone have any tips or tricks that could help me out?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. tem

    tem Well-Known Member

    try bunchen the skin up a little. as it dries it will relax a little. play with it as it dries. brushing the hair the way the skin is folded. do this till it dries.
     

  3. Try pinning neck foam of various sizes where you have the wrinkles in the form. Leave for a couple of days or until it dies
     
  4. First, you have to have enough skin to create the "rolls". If the form is too big you will never get the look that you are after. I make the grooves in the form a bit wider and deeper, but i round the edges into each crease. You do not want a hard edge, so round it off. I don't start working the skin rolls till everything else is done and in place. Face, brisket, ears, sewn up, arm pits. I also staple the brisket and pits before I start the skin rolls. Start pulling the skin forward and tuck it into the crease. it will take you some time to get it all right and the hair looking good.
     
  5. TripleC

    TripleC Member

    55
    12
    Georgia
    Lifesigns,

    I am curious as well. Are you also using clay in the grooves that you widened and deepened? I had trouble as well, but I think my issue was what you hit on with the form size and how tight the skin was.
     
  6. Rick Slife

    Rick Slife Member

    35
    2
    Thanks for the input. I think maybe I'm not giving myself enough extra hide to get the full "roll" effect that I'm after. I'll try these suggestion on the next one.... thanks again, very much appreciated!!
     
  7. No, I do not use clay. If your form is undersized, then clay can be used to build it up. To me, too much emphasis is placed on cutting, grooving or claying up. If you get your hands on a short haired dog,........I have great danes, push their skin together and you will see beautiful and perfect skin rolls just magically appear! Obviously the deer hair is a bit longer and the animal is dead, but you can actually make the rolls without carving into the form. By using some grooves, it just makes it a bit easier and faster and you dont have to baby sit it as much. Remember, it is mostly the skin that wrinkles and not the muscles. The longer the hair, less rolls should be visible. Taxi the skin around and just have fun with it. If it isn't working, taxi the hid back and start over again.
     
  8. Duckslayr

    Duckslayr Active Member

    First of all, think about how wrinkles are formed naturally. They aren't in the muscle, but the skin. When we try to recreate this, we are using a tanned skin that is now thinner, with no fat layer, that is going to wrinkle differently than living skin. So, to make them as natural as possible, we need to recreate a thicker skin where we want wrinkles. Many fillers will work, but I prefer elephant snot (hide paste thickened with mache) You will need a loose fit to do this well. But here's the other problem for the commercial taxidermist. Everyone wants a big neck! So, to accommodate this, I carve the wrinkles I want into the form. THIS ISN'T anatomically correct! Whenever we are trying to make hide fit different anatomy than it had while alive, hair patterns are a challenge. Your best bet IMO...keep the neck fat and the wrinkles subtle.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  9. TripleC

    TripleC Member

    55
    12
    Georgia
    Lifesigns/Jared,

    Thanks for the explanation/guidance. Greatly appreciated. I never thought of it in the way the two of you described. Makes a lot more sense now. Thanks.
     
  10. With the proper sized form I have had success using hide paste mixed with vermiculite. It forms nice smooth wrinkles.
     
  11. This is all IMO only (I always start with that so people don't jump down my throat when they disagree) ;) As with everything on here, take it or leave it. This is how I achieve the look in my photos.

    I do not use extra clay or rasp out any foam to achieve this look. I will however, use a little extra hide paste in the area where wrinkles are present to 'plump and smooth' them a bit. Your form [obviously] cannot be too big or you'll do nothing but struggle. You do not want tight/creased wrinkles as they look too harsh and unnatural. I will slightly gather enough hide (it should already be there) in the 'wrinkle' area of the neck and let the bunches form where they want... to some degree, then adjust to your liking from there. Don't pull the hide too far back on the shoulders or there won't be enough hide to get the proper look. I hope I helped a little...
    Good luck!
     

    Attached Files: