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ross goose paint scheme

Discussion in 'Bird Taxidermy' started by allison1952, Jul 5, 2017.

  1. allison1952

    allison1952 Member

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    what color or colors do you mix with red to tone the color down on ross geese feet and bill, water based brush application..appreciate any and all advice..Thank you
     
  2. Hunts4ducks

    Hunts4ducks New Member

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    Not to be a smart A$$, but if you are going to be doing birds, you need to buy the Breakthrough Bird Finishing Manual - it tells every NA specie paint schedule in detail using both lacquer based and water based paints.
     

  3. nate

    nate Active Member

    Can't remember the last time I used a paint schedule. I just mix and match, layer, mist, steel wool, coat , etc; etc; till I get the desired effect I'm looking for. Some species more, some less.
     
  4. critterstuffr

    critterstuffr New Member

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    Brown will tone it down. Now when i say this I use an air brush (if i was you i'd invest in one) and I mist it over the red or flesh color to tone it down some. Then a wash with white. Then Matt clear coat. As mentioned that book will be a great help but only if you have it in front of you which you don't and wasn't your question. Order that when and if you get your self an air brush.

    Good Luck
     
  5. Hunts4ducks

    Hunts4ducks New Member

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    Still a good investment and not that much money........
     
  6. allison1952

    allison1952 Member

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    Thanks for the advice. Appreciate it.
     
  7. Hey Nate - You mention steel wool. I'm curious what you use that for while paining bills/feet? Is it to rough up a previous coat so the next layer bonds better or to rub some of the previous color off so it's not so bold.

    Thanks - Dave
     
  8. nate

    nate Active Member

    Hi Dave. It gives it an antiquing effect. Much like painting a fish reproduction