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The latest CWD info I just learned.

Discussion in 'The Taxidermy Industry' started by 3bears, Aug 18, 2017.

  1. msestak

    msestak Well-Known Member

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    John C, the Center for Disease control agrees with you. they say even though there is no verifiable evidence that CWD can infect Humans DO NOT EAT MEAT from an infected animal.
     
  2. While the CDC and the NIHS says not known yet. Last year a taxidermist died from vCJ and another lady who hunted the hot zone in Arkansas a lot and ate deer and elk died from it, one of my clients had a small acreage near the hot zone, just off the park. Now he loved squirrel brains. A man my dad was in Korea with also hunted the area a lot andhe also died from vCJ.

    Many residents of the area have a form of Alzheimer.

    The fact it can be in anything corn, wheat, oats and carried down stream in water,half the size of a virus.

    What I find totally appealing is the Arkansas Game and Fish says debone the meat and bury the bones where you killed the deer. Well that spreads it infects the ground and water.
    I would think a central collection facility for each county would work better. I am stuck between a rock and a boulder. My trash service says they will not pick up animal waste. The Arkansas Game and Fish says I will send it in the trash to a lined land fill. So what do I do?
     

  3. msestak

    msestak Well-Known Member

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    found this on another site:

    http://www.wyofile.com/cwd-may-transmittable-eating-game-meat/


    I have a question about this from the article:

    i can understand the CWD injection. they just took the CWD and injected it into the brain, those results were a No-Brainer, it was going to happen.

    BUT...the CWD infected muscle has me concerned. was it from an animal that died from CWD or did they inject CWD into the muscle and then into the stomach tube. if that was the procedure it certainly IS NOT SCIENTIFIC as there is no way to know if CWD is in the muscle of an infected animal or the exact amount of CWD in the muscle of an infected animal.

    This test is suspect, at least to me. anyway, i don't plan on eating venison from any CWD positive animal.
     
  4. ANDY

    ANDY Well-Known Member

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    I haven't heard anything offical yet but I talked to a guy last night and another today that are finding alot of dead deer. Two different counties
    miles apart.
     
  5. http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/08/arkansas-cwd-tse-prion-214-cases.html
     
  6. Terry Bennett

    Terry Bennett Well-Known Member

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    John C,

    Are the positive tests from hunter harvested deer or from deer that were found sick or dead? I didn't see that info on the link.

    Thanks
     
  7. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Terry, John may have other info but, I haven't come up with any proof that wild deer, cwd positive, were found dead. That in itself is the "Catch 22" in this situation. After our conversation this AM, I talked with the vet in charge of depopulating a local private herd, and they still are unsure of anything. I will be talking to her tomorrow again. Hopefully she will be more candid with me and answer some questions, but, I doubt it., she does work for the USDA.
     
  8. msestak

    msestak Well-Known Member

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    they should be incinerating the boned deer carcass. extremely high amounts of heat will kill it. like a cremation. sad part is they know this, so why bury it. it just helps to spread the thing faster.
     
  9. I dont know, I urged the AGFC to have centrally located reefer units for disposal.

    The Deer from the last season were hunter harvested deer.

    Andy this is the time of year that EHD is rampant in deer herds.
     
  10. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    John, the only issue I see with the reefer rigs, is the clean up afterwords. The government is so redundant at times that they would have to incinerate each rig after use, whether there was any positive deer stored in it or not, just in case they missed one. Who's gonna pay for that? Nobody wants to give up any money from their pet projects to finance this. You know as well as I do, nobody is willing to work together on this issue, from top to bottom.
     
  11. ANDY

    ANDY Well-Known Member

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    I understand but there wasn't any issue last year or the year before. Weve had plenty of rain this summer also , so cant blame on any small puddles.
     
  12. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Well I had a lengthy chat with a USDA vet today. It was somewhat enlightening. The unofficial approach of the USDA is that there is never a negative result from a CWD test only an "Undecteble" result.
    The herd they depopulated was under quarantine for the last three years and if the owner hadn't agreed to a buy out, if he had just waited 2 more years he would have passed the test, providing no positives turned up. If his herd comes up with any positives he has to keep the enclosures up for only 5 years excluding all critters that may be infected by CWD. As it stands now, in 5 years he could reintroduce deer to the property. That one perplexes me, as they aren't sure how long the prions remain viable. The bucks were still in velvet and their biggest concern was cleaning the velvet off the racks, as they promised the owner that he could retain all hard horned antlers with a cleaned skull cap. They wanted me to try to explain how to remove it or even help them do it but, OSHA would not allow me to be involved. The antlers and skull caps were soaked and scrubbed in a bleach solution. I inquired why, from what I've learned, it doesn't degrade the prions, but I was informed that it can start to degrade the prions and lesson the chance of transmission. I'm not sure I agree with that but, it is also their protocol. She mentioned that consuming CWD positive deer has actually been linked to infecting humans. She suggested that all deer be tested. I white tail deer CWD shows up in the lymph nodes often times before it is detectable in the brain but in elk it is different it shows up in the tonsils first, that's interesting. This is bigger than just hurting our industry. They are afraid of the ramifications to the food chain of the world. We also did discuss mad cow disease during this discussion brought up by her. There is probably more info that I will remember as time goes by and I'll add to this as I remember or learn more.
     
  13. Good info 3bears.
     
  14. msestak

    msestak Well-Known Member

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    THIS....is what they want to keep quiet. since they know it can get into plants and other animals, why do they still allow animal "By products" to be added to food we feed our pets, or anything for that matter, just gotta wonder why. maybe its because their God is greed and Green.
     
  15. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Not to scare you or anyone else but, think about this msestak, even vegetarians may contract cwd, if positive animals piss on the plants they eat. Allowing animal parts as a protein additive in livestock feed isn't the likely cause of this and maybe tighter restrictions are warranted, I'm not sure it will stop it or even slow it down.
     
  16. msestak

    msestak Well-Known Member

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    thats it exactly. no one is safe if this gets into everything. carnivore, omnivore, herbivore, we are all at risk.

    might have to switch over to fish and anything that grows on a tree instead of smaller ground based plants.
     
  17. msestak

    msestak Well-Known Member

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    just read a ladies obituary today. the top line said she died from a brief illness caused by CJD. have not seen any news about any investigation of meat products. isn't CJD a meat related disease ?
     
  18. Any disease related to PRION 14-3-3 is a transmissible spongiform Enchephlopothy. TSA. Part of my Saturday was briefing some concerned folks about CWD. If a human can catch madcow from bovine, then a human can catch vCJD or straight CJ from the deer meat.

    Trees, wheat, oats corn all can pickup the malformed prion. Squirrels carry CJD
     
  19. Decontamination Methods for Prions
    The safest and most unambiguous method for ensuring that there is no risk of residual
    prion infectivity is to discard and destroy contaminated materials by incineration.
    Instruments that will be reused should be kept moist between the time of exposure to
    prions and subsequent decontamination and cleaning.
    Current research indicates that inactivation of prions may be achieved by applying one
    of the following methods:
    Liquid Wastes

    Mix with NaOH for a final concentration of 1.0 N NaOH and hold for 24 hours.
    Neutralize and dispose of down the drain or hold for chemical waste disposal.

    Autoclave at 132
    o
    C for 4½ hours and dispose of down the drain.
    Heat Resistant Instruments

    Soak in 2.0 N NaOH for 1 hour (or 1.0 N NaOH for 2 hours). Rinse and autoclave
    autoclave at 134
    o
    C for 1 hour.

    Immerse in 1.0 N NaOH and autoclave at 121
    o
    C for 30 min. Clean and rinse.

    Soak in 1.0 N NaOH (or full-strength household bleach) for 1 hour. Rinse and place
    open pan, covering with water if desired. Autoclave at 121
    o
    C for 1 hour.

    Immerse in 1.0 N NaOH and boil for 10 min. Clean and rinse.

    Immerse in full-strength household bleach (or 1.0 N NaOH) for 1 hour. Clean and
    rinse.

    Autoclave at 132
    o
    C for 4½ hours.
    Surfaces and Heat Sensitive Instruments

    Flood with 2.0 N NaOH or full-strength household bleach and let stand for 1 hour.
    Mop up and rinse with water.

    Clean with 1.0 N NaOH allowing a 5 minute contact time, followed by a wipedown
    with 1.0 N HCl. Rinse with water.

    Where surfaces cannot tolerate the proceeding methods, thorough cleaning will
    remove most infectivity by dilution and some additional benefit may be derived from
    the use of one or another of the partially effective methods listed in the table below.
    Dry Materials, Dry Waste, Sharps

    Heat in porous load autoclave at 134
    o
    C for 1 hour.

    Autoclave at 132
    o
    C for 4½ hours.

    Identify container with label reading “Prion-Contaminated– For Incineration Only”.
    Arrange for pick-up and final destruction by incineration.
    Contaminated Skin Surfaces and Splashes to the Eye

    Swab skin with 1.0 N NaOH for 5 minutes. Rinse with copious amounts of water.

    Eyes are rinsed with copious amounts of water or saline
    only

    Ineffective or Sub-Optimal Prion Disinfection Methods
    Chemical Disinfectants
    Gaseous
    Disinfectants
    Physical Processes
    Ineffective
    Ineffective
    Ineffective
    Alcohol Ethylene oxide Boiling
    Ammonia Formaldehyde Dry heat (<300
    o
    C)
    β
    -propiolactone
    Formalin
    Variably or Partially Effective
    Hydrochloric acid
    Autoclaving at 121°C for 15 minutes
    Peracetic acid
    Boiling in sodi
    um dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (3%)
    Phenolics
    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (5%)
    Variably or Partially Effective
    Chlorine dioxide
    Glutaraldehyde
    Guanidinium thiocynate (4 M)
    Iodophores
    Sodium dichloro-isocynaurate
    Sodium metaperiodate
    Urea (6 M)
     
  20. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    John C. Not that I question what you posted about decontamination but, could you please state your source or sources? Thank you.