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Non-hardening clay

Discussion in 'Deer and Gameheads' started by whitetails and fish only, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. whitetails and fish only

    whitetails and fish only Well-Known Member

    I have been using critter clay to model eye lids on deer mounts but it always gets a little messed up when I put the skin on the form. So am wondering if the plasteline non-hardening clay would work. Seems like it would be harder to work with but would stay in place better. I don't know if it would have a negative affect on the skin? This would be the eye tuck method.
     
  2. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    It is an oil based clay. You will basically trying to glue the hide to a clump of oil, which one would think that it doesn't make sense to use it. However, there are national and world champions that do just that and swear by it. I remember a thread years ago on this subject and was surprised by all the people who used it and why.

    I have used with no problems during or after. I prefer critter clay though.

    I don't remember who or why, but, to answer your question, Yes it will work and work well.
     

  3. Paul B

    Paul B Active Member

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    If your having trouble messing up the clay work putting the skin on, it will be worse with the non- hardening clay. I do my clay work a hour before mounting, do the ears, sew a hole or two, them mount. Clay will tighten up nicely.
     
  4. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    I rough in my clay work around my eyes before I mount them but NEVER try to finish them until the very last step in the mounting process. If you'd rather not do it that way, Apoxie Sculpt is the way to go.
     
  5. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I either do the critter clay work hrs before I mount and let it harden some or the night before and lay plastic wrap on it to prevent cracking. I have used apoxie sculpt before, however, you have a couple of hours to get it right and then there will be no adjusting after the the apoxie kicks.
     
  6. whitetails and fish only

    whitetails and fish only Well-Known Member

    Thanks to everyone that has responded to this thread. Very interesting. I have a follow up question about use of epoxy putties. Would it work if you sculpted your eye lids and pressed in the tucking grooves ahead of mounting day and then let it harden. I know that you would not be able to adjust the putty but if done right would it be possible to glue and tuck the skin and have a good eye?
     
  7. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I have successfully done just that. I don't use much skin when I tuck, less than an eighth inch.
     
  8. You can also use a hairdryer on your clay,will speed up the hardening process.
     
  9. Paul B

    Paul B Active Member

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    Not every deer eye opening is a big as you think. You can pre sculpt it in epoxy to match a 32 mm eye but the eye skin opening may be to small, then your going to need clay or more epoxy to fill it in. Or it can go the other way, you made the epoxy work to small of a eye opening and now the eye skin is bunching up all over. Best use it before it hardens.
     
  10. Heath Cline

    Heath Cline Well-Known Member

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    Ohio
    Another option is to do your clay or apoxie work through the eye opening once you have everything mounted up. This way you wont damage your clay work.
     
  11. I just use the eyehorns from Research to protect the clay when I put the cape on. Before I started using those, I learned another trick from Mark Gonnerring / do eye clay after put cape on form- but not through eye holes, just pull the cape back down past eyes to do clay. Then just lift it back up over eyes and won't mess it up.
     
  12. woakley144

    woakley144 Active Member

    I haven't tried the oil based clay yet on a deer, but Brian Hendricks did a seminar at the Texas Convention using oil based clay for bobcat eyes..... I have been using it and getting some fantastic results!! Was going to try it with a whitetail this year to see what the results would be.