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What's your hourly shop time

Discussion in 'The Taxidermy Industry' started by Terry Bennett, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. PA

    PA Well-Known Member

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    " So with an hourly rate of $50-$100 dollars adding in supplies and overhead, with on average of 8 to 10 labor hours"

    Say the rate was 100.00 and you worked 8 hours a day. The gross would be $800.00/day. This should be covering every thing you do in the shop. 52 weeks, 2 weeks vacation, comes to 50 week and 4000.00 a week for a gross of $200,000.00. What percentage of taxidermists do you all think have a gross of 200K ?
     
  2. <1%
     

  3. woakley144

    woakley144 Active Member

    @ PA ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D I don't want to have to work that hard....... I still love to fish.... I mean do research on fish colors in the area....... ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::)
     
  4. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Not many at all simply because they are convinced that they can only have a maximum shop rate of $18 per hour, which some day they hope to achieve, and they pay for shipping out of their own pocket.
     
  5. Sonnyknight

    Sonnyknight Member

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    I would say get no less than 50 per hour. I see people that have been at it for a longer than me and get 375 for a deer head they say it's my area but I have a friend in a close state that is going up to 500. In my '' area '' the average is about 525 I get 580 sop I say it is up to you if you want to loose money or make money.

    Sonny
     
  6. woakley144

    woakley144 Active Member

    With supplies going up about 8%, and UPS going up on shipping I had to increase the cost of ALL my work...... Besides that I was the cheapest in the area, I have now found out that I AM a taxidermist and my work is as good as any.....(Except the masters) but I will get there!!!
     
  7. Terry Bennett

    Terry Bennett Active Member

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    Idaho
    Just because it isn't a necessity doesn't mean people aren't willing to pay for it. The last time I had my jet boat in the shop a couple years ago their rate was $85/ hour. I would make the case my boat is a necessity, but my wife doesn't think so.

    Have you priced a new bow lately, or a side by side UTV, or any of the other myriad gadgets and bells and whistles that sportsman buy?

    It reminds me of a client I used to have. He pulled in the driveway with his new Ford f250 pulling a trailer with 3 or 4 atvs. He would then proceed to show me the new custom rifle he just bought. Then as we were unloading the animal that he wanted to have mounted he would start to haggle me for a "Good Deal". He is some other saps problem now.
     
  8. landdepot

    landdepot Active Member

    I 100% agree with you on what outdoor folks choose to spend their money on...I too don't get riding around in or on $50,000 worth of gear then worry about an extra $200 on a deer head,..which is to me the most important part in my opinion.

    That being said the OP referred to in comparison his refrigerator guy's rates,..which is comparable to electricians etc,... basically some sort of utility.

    I agreed with Hammers post that they really can't be compared but that doesn't mean I don't think taxidermy is'nt worth the $$$. I agreed with it more from the point of view that if the electric goes out/car breaks down/refrigerator goes out/ac compressor goes out etc... etc,...that "most" folks are gonna get that stuff fixed or replaced no matter what. They may shop around,.but they will be viewing it as a necessity and it is 100% going to happen. No part of taxidermy is a necessity,...if money is tight enough people just wont get it done,...in that way it is apples to oranges for me. I view taxidermy as wildlife art,.....there is no art that is a necessity,..it's disposable income.

    I hate to agree with anybody's wife but unless your making a living somehow with that boat,...no it is not a necessity either in my opinion.
     
  9. Sonnyknight

    Sonnyknight Member

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    Well ya gotta think to why does a guy wanna go pay 1500 to shoot a bear but 300 to mount it lol and get crap.
     
  10. John Jennings just wrote us another EXCELLENT business article that will be in your next issue of Breakthrough (it's now at the printer)!

    He wrote. "If you don’t understand where your costs are coming from, you won’t be able to accurately price your work and earn a profit. There are three types of costs that must be considered to calculate your sales price. Overlooking these costs can lead to your downfall."

    He then describes the three types of costs and how to use them to determine your price that is IN ADDITION to an hourly rate.

    To subscribe or renew, call Anne at 800-783-7266 or visit www.breakthroughmagazine.com.
     
  11. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Those articles, to me, are worth the subscription price alone. If you do not get Breakthrough Magazine, you are missing out on a wealth of knowledge!
     
  12. JuJu Bee

    JuJu Bee New Member

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    I agree with Kathy 100%....I doubt any single poster has ever done a P & L report on each and every mount or species to KNOW exactly what they are actually making and what exactly what their costs were.
    The part taxidermist miss most is when the key goes into the lock in the morning....and when it goes into the lock at night....YOU ARE ON THE CLOCK. You don`t start counting when you put your hands on a mount. I GUARANTEE a lot of you are making NO WHERE NEAR what you think you are making.

    "Shop rate" is a useless idea, it reflects Extra Work or repair work. I could say $500 a hour, if I don`t ACTUALLY MAKE THAT what does it matter. The taxidermy industry is in DIRE need of business sense and application. Just like every other business on the planet.
     
  13. JuJu Bee

    JuJu Bee New Member

    58
    3
    I agree with Kathy 100%....I doubt any single poster has ever done a P & L report on each and every mount or species to KNOW exactly what they are actually making and exactly what their costs were.
    The part taxidermist miss most is when the key goes into the lock in the morning....and when it goes into the lock at night....YOU ARE ON THE CLOCK. You don`t start counting when you put your hands on a mount. I GUARANTEE a lot of you are making NO WHERE NEAR what you think you are making.

    "Shop rate" is a useless idea, it reflects Extra Work or repair work. I could say $500 a hour, if I don`t ACTUALLY MAKE THAT what does it matter. The taxidermy industry is in DIRE need of business sense and application. Just like every other business on the planet.
     
  14. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    You younger guys and gals just don't understand. I started with nothing but a Case knife and a needle and thread from me mothers sewing box. I mounted and mounted and then I mounted some more animals til I got good. People come from far and wide to bring me their trophies. I build a business, pay for my house, send my sons off to a university. Mrs Murphey drives a fine car. I build her a pool. We both work very hard. You take all that stuff, subtract a Case knife and a needle and thread, and that's my profit!
     
  15. EA

    EA Well-Known Member

    I like your thinking Joey.
     
  16. jjennings.m

    jjennings.m Member

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    Kathy, thank you for the kind words.

    There are many ways to do taxidermy, so it goes without saying, there are many ways to run a successful taxidermy business. Pricing is one of the hardest decisions a business owner has to make. It’s not always about costs though, one must consider other factors like their efficiency, local economy, competition, and how they market themselves. What works for one may not work for another. So in my Breakthrough article I try to provide a starting point to which everyone can apply their own uniqueness. Running a profitable business can be an art form in and of itself.
     
  17. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    My advice to those wanting to start doing taxidermy has always been to not learn taxidermy until you have learned business. Pay for business classes first, then taxidermy classes after.
     
  18. livbucks

    livbucks Well-Known Member

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    Some have said they only take 2 hours to do a deer. A $550 deer would make it close to $200 an hour shop rate were that true.
     
  19. freeze_1

    freeze_1 Booboo, my business manager


    Way to go Joeym, and a lot of hard work and devotion .
     
  20. Jerry Huffaker

    Jerry Huffaker Well-Known Member

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    We don't have a shop rate, every job is a bid price.