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Boar Skull

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by kengog, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. kengog

    kengog New Member

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    This is a follow up to my previous thread: http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,408440.0.html

    As soon as the warm weather arrived I took the boar skull and submerged it in hot water and Dawn detergent in a plastic tub with a cover and let it sit outside in the sun. Once a month I removed the skull and sprayed/scrubbed off any loose paint, refreshed the water/dawn mixture and placed it back in the sun.

    After 3 months I removed it and again sprayed/scrapped any loose paint. Once it was dry I set it in a tub with Sally's 40 volume liquid. I did not have enough to submerge the entire skull so I tried covering it with paper towels, making sure to baste it occausionally to keep the paper towels moist. After 1 week I removed the paper towel and rised and dried the skull. This gave some improvement, mostly with the teeth/tusks, but there was still a lot of darkness.

    I picked up some of the Sally's 40 volume gel and brushed it over the entire skull and wrapped the skull and jaw separately in plastic wrap. I put these in the sun on sunny days and brought them in on raining days. I did this for a week. I removed the plastic wrap and could see the gel was still foaming, but most of it was at the bottom. I risned it off and am letting it dry.

    Although there is more improvement, there is still darkness especially in the forehead, cheeks, and jaw. I am not sure what to do at this point. I was consifering mixing the Sally's with some basic white to thicken things up a bit more so hoping it will stick better. I've attached some pictures and open for suggestions.

    thanks,

    -kg
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Submerge it in water again with Dawn and heat it 24/7 to 115 degrees. Let it sit for another month or so that way. Water has to be heated. What you are seeing is still grease. Or you can try straight ammonia for at least a month unheated. Hardware store stuff is stronger.
     

  3. BeerHunter14

    BeerHunter14 Member

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    Straight acetone for month , Degrease with hot water and dawn and ammonia for a week then acetone again. Once you have done this a few times, Go to a pool supply store and buy either soft swim c or bo both are 27% hydrogen peroxide. Do not get it on you or in your eyes.

    soak in the peroxide for 1-2 days, remove, flush with water and let it dry in the sun.

    Keep doing this until you get your desired results.

    Also might not hurt soaking in hot water and iron out. There may be some Deep mineral stains in there also. This will Clear most mineral problems up.
     
  4. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Acetone will also work as above but it is costly to submerge something that won't fit in a 5 gallon bucket. Acetone will probably be the only thing that you can use to make sure all the paint layers are gone. This might have also gotten a coat of some type of spray sealer which the acetone will also remove. The bone looks like it has some degradation to it so I would avoid the Iron Out until the last step if needed. I use it as a last resort and still don't trust it completely. I would not continue to use the cream peroxide as it has oil in it which is what you are trying to get out of the bone. If you want to paste it and don't have the Basic White or don't want to purchase it, make a paste with talcum powder. Sun has nothing to do with the whitening power of a peroxide paste. What makes it work is heat, not sunlight. Get it in front of a heat source even a heat lamp and keep rotating it to get all sides. I would not continue to keep hitting it with peroxide though until you are happy with the grease removal. If the bone is deteriorating at all, the strong peroxides can weaken it if you aren't careful. Hogs are a royal pain and you might be looking at 6 months or more to get the grease out. Chances are it was cleaned by boiling and that drives the grease to get deeper into the bone.
     
  5. IndustrialElectric

    IndustrialElectric New Member

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    Hey Yall,

    My Company www.industrialelectricheating.com custom manufactures heating elements that may be useful for taxidermy
    please check out the website and give me a call if you have any questions we also can custom make a heating element for your specific application

    thanks again
    -Matt
     
  6. You make another company and hide? Same guy trying again to burn down yor house http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,240355
     
  7. kengog

    kengog New Member

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    On the lower jaw, one of the tusks is very long. It's loose, but I can't pull it out all the way because it hits the jaw bone. Should I pull it out as far as it goes and cut it, then glue it back in later, or just leave it be and glue it in when finished?

    -kg
     
  8. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    I would just leave it. Personally, I hate cutting specimens if I don't have to. If it won't come out, no reason to even really glue it unless you want it in a certain position. Use Elmer's white glue too. Won't be seen when dry. Sometimes, with older and abused specimens like this, you will never get it perfect. I just chalk it up to the character of the piece and leave it at that. As long is it isn't stinking or attracting bugs (or dripping grease) and it's for my personal collection I'm usually glad that I have something unusual and keep it as is.
     
  9. kengog

    kengog New Member

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    Finished. Thanks to everyone for their help and suggestions.

    -kg
     

    Attached Files: