1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Insect in deer esophagus?

Discussion in 'Deer and Gameheads' started by midnightblue69, Dec 30, 2017.

  1. midnightblue69

    midnightblue69 New Member

    18
    0
    Working on a deer head and I found these bugs in the esophagus, what are they, anyone run into this? parasite? They look like common grubs but in a deer's esophagus? Wondering about the integrity of the meat when eaten.
     

    Attached Files:

    • bugs.jpg
      bugs.jpg
      File size:
      84.5 KB
      Views:
      784
  2. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I have seen these in deer and rabbits. I ate the deer and rabbits with no ill effects.
     

  3. They’re called nasal bot flies.
     
  4. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Yep.
     
  5. KatieC

    KatieC Active Member

    I've seen these too, was wondering about them. I'm sure glad I'm not a deer!
     
  6. socalmountainman

    socalmountainman Northwestern School of Taxidermy - Class of '73

    X3, I used to field this question quite frequently during the deer seasons. A news source would get a story from a local hunter who had never seen them and the reporters would call us at the CA Dept of Food and Agriculture where I was an entomologist for over 20 years. Quite harmless to the deer, the bot fly would lay her eggs on the deer's nose and the deer would lick his nose and start the strange symbiotic relationship where clearly, the fly larvae benefited the most!
    https://bugguide.net/node/view/260374
     
  7. midnightblue69

    midnightblue69 New Member

    18
    0
    Have to say that is disturbing, intriguing, a relief and cool new factoid all in one!
    Thanks guys
    Happy New Year and God bless!
     
  8. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Symbiotic? Really? I'd never heard that and always thought they were parasites. What do they do for the deer?
     
  9. mopsrdrawer67

    mopsrdrawer67 Member

    174
    2
    They are not really parasites since they don't attach themselves to the deer. Down here in Mississippi, they are in the majority of the deer that I get in the shop. I don't know if they eventually pass through the deer naturally, come out their nose or mouth or whatever. I find them way up in the nasal cavity, so I wonder if they make their way into the lungs??
     
  10. joeym

    joeym Old Murphey

    http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10370_12150_12220-26640--,00.html
     
  11. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member


    A parasite doesn't need to attach themselves. They just live off of the host.
     
  12. dwimberly

    dwimberly Member

    133
    4
    MS
    we have always referred to them as "Lung Worms". Of course I have never known the technical name for them. I have ate many deer with them and more times than not I see them in deer. Nothing to worry about when it comes to consumption.
     
  13. midnightblue69

    midnightblue69 New Member

    18
    0
    I did a fair amount of reading and as I understand it, they're common and essentially harmless to the deer. When mature they leave if not sneezed out before
     
  14. socalmountainman

    socalmountainman Northwestern School of Taxidermy - Class of '73

    Sorry guys for the delay... too much holiday glee. The nasal bot fly larva is a parasite. It does attach itself to the mucuos membrane with tiny little hooks on its mouth. It stays attached while sucking up, you guessed it, nasal stuff, saliva liquids and now and then a little blood if it bites too hard. "Strange Symbiosis" I said because it does manage to clean the areas pretty darn well (think maggots eating infectious wounds in medicine). It does not, for the most part, harm the deer but there are cases where they can irritate or worse. It remains attached until fully mature where it then releases itself to be expelled to continue with pupation. :)
     
  15. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Thanks