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I Wonder How Good A taxidermist This Man WouldBe?

Discussion in 'The Taxidermy Industry' started by DL, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. Dave Byrd

    Dave Byrd Active Member

    I think the guy would make a better mortician than a taxidermist!
     
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  2. livbucks

    livbucks Well-Known Member

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    I am still trying to figure out who wants lifelike tiny people? Kinda creepy.
     
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  3. Ron B

    Ron B Life Sucks.....Then comes the death roll!!!!

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    What? You got something against little people you biggot?:mad::mad::mad:
     
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  4. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    We saw one of those busts at the Crystal Palaces Museum in Rogers AR. It was so lifelike I couldn't keep my eyes off it. Skill, patience, creativity, and artistry way beyond my humble efforts at taxidermy. Rick, you are correct. If that guy ever entered taxidermy, he'd turn some heads, for sure.
     
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  5. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Ron, I think you're touching upon another (age old) subject. Taxidermy, is it Art? Whereas Rick was just pointing out that it takes Artistic talent to do this well. Certainly as taxidermists we are extremely limited on what expressive things we can do. Eyes, positioning of the mount, etc.) And I agree, the habitat is the area where we can be most expressive when it comes to true Art.

    As an example of what I would consider crossing into the gray area I've attached a cpl of pics of A Spotted Bay Bass replica I did of the potential California State Record (released). (Actually a modified Yellow Grouper blank/State record SBB doesn't exist!) Some of the limitations we have can also be intensified with other limitations such as shipping. Not only does it have to be durable enough to ship, but shipping size limitations also have to be thought through beforehand. Weight is another consideration. It can't be too heavy where it can fall off the wall. Budget is another major factor. You gotta give your client the best bang for their buck. This custom habitat doesn't have all that much stuff that I fabricated from scratch. Much of it was purchased. The hard part was figuring out a way to put it all together that is both creative and cost effective. In this case I used two of the same McKenzie foam "Piling" I believe it's called, flipped one, lined up the cracks/lines and screwed it together. This would have been a major pain to fabricate from scratch and expensive. This took a little bit of planning to bring together. With the limitations we have oftentimes the planning and assembly part is really the CREATIVE part! Of course the story the piece tells, the composition is what possibly crosses the line into the "Is it Art" arena IMO. My client loved the "Big Bud" lure touch I did as we both grew up when those things first came out! This also was done to be viewed from the front, sides, bottom and top. The fish is painted on both sides. Nowhere to hide with attachments and hiding that also takes some artistic talent to pull off well IMO. But whether or not it's "Art" all that matters is my client thinks so! :) SpottedBayBass1.jpg SpottedBayBassA.jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2018
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  6. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    “But whether or not it's "Art" all that matters is my client thinks so”

    That’s correct. They’re the ones that pay the bills and they can call it whatever they want.
     
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  7. den007

    den007 Active Member

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    Man I would like to get into that. I wonder who supplies the forms??Grays? Archie Phillips? LOL Seriously.......the man is truly on a bell curve all his own. Genius. I don't know how he sleeps with those things around. If I thought I saw one move, I would piss myself. Kind of like Blade Runner. Needs to get them to turn their heads and star at you once in awhile.
     
  8. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

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    like any craft or hobby materials techniques get better with time and advances in technology taxidermists today are just learning the craft with the methods materials of the times nothing more nothing less with having say a fish form they devote more time into improving painting etc rather than carving or filling so in time taxidermists as a whole will be better than in the past when only a few were true artists
     
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  9. Trophy Specialist

    Trophy Specialist Well-Known Member

    The person that said that good is a relative term is absolutely right when it comes to taxidermy. In my opinion the best taxidermists are the ones making the most money for the least amount of work.
     
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  10. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    That was me that said the relative comment. Compared to this guy my work is GOD AWFUL!!! And probably "pretty bad" to some and "acceptable" to others and maybe even "awesome" to a few others. I'm just looking for those "few others" to pay my bills - lol! In all honesty, this guy probably doesn't even come close to being compensated fairly for his time and many of us probably make a better hourly rate. Especially if you consider all of his pieces that didn't turn out building up to this level!
     
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  11. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Although I like your comment, that would be the best and most successful business owners, would it not?
     
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  12. Trophy Specialist

    Trophy Specialist Well-Known Member

    Yes and no. Some people work super hard and very long hours to be the most successful business owners, thus my "making the most money for the hours worked" clause. To elaborate, the taxidermists that impress me the most charge a lot of money for their work and gets it done in below average hours. For instance, my hero would be someone who charges $800 for a deer head and only takes 5 or 6 hours to complete it and additionally he or she is maxed out on work, spends minimal on advertising, and has very low operating expenses.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2018
  13. den007

    den007 Active Member

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    I just saw that fish with the beer can. I love it! Yes, I would indeed call it art. Very creative. In this neck of the woods, I cannot say how many times i have seen beer cans in areas they do not belong. Slobs. Here, it is Old Milwaukee, Milwaukee's Best (or Beast) and malt liquor that is 12% alcohol like Loko. You never see Heinekens or Stella Artois. Crap piles under tree stands, cig butts and garbage wedged into cracks in a tree trunk, on and on.
     
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  14. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Thank you Dennis. That's actually "lure litter" btw. One of those old "Big Bud" lures everybody got back in the day as a novelty. Kind've a subtle play on not only the littering of humans, but also playing with the fact that "who in their right mind would actually use that thing?". (Too long of a title though to put on a trophy plate - lol!)
     
  15. livbucks

    livbucks Well-Known Member

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    Im watching the Bride of Chuckie right now. Weird coincidence.
     
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  16. Ron B

    Ron B Life Sucks.....Then comes the death roll!!!!

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    Thought you didn't like short people?
     
  17. Ron B

    Ron B Life Sucks.....Then comes the death roll!!!!

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    I understand and do agree that artistic talent can shorten the learning curve tremendously but I feel this craft can be "learned". Knowledge is more important than natural ability in this game though they can both sure complement each other! But what I feel separates a good taxidermist from a great taxidermist is not necessarily talent, but simply a severe case of.... OCD!! Its just never good... "enough"!!

    Besides....when all is said and done most of us are just making a living off the "talent" of the sculptors that make our forms!!!:oops:
     
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  18. landdepot

    landdepot Active Member

    The guy is talented, could probably do about whatever he put his mind to as far as art/taxidermy goes. Unfortunately I don't think artistic ability is the most important trait to be a successful taxidermist, a great one yes. Two different things,..on occasion they merge.
     
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  19. Rick Carter

    Rick Carter Administrator

    Who wants to be just OK? either strive for the best or hunt something you can be good at.
     
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  20. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    Rick I agree and right now I’m the best chocolate eater there has ever been. Gotta bet back to work!
     
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