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Arrowheads

Discussion in 'Wildlife Artwork and Crafts' started by dale65, May 6, 2018.

  1. dale65

    dale65 Active Member

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    I think a lot of the time they would camp real close to some kind of water like a creek or river there is a river not far from the place I go but the place is right on a big creek that runs into the river and it's on the high side of the creek but that said iv see where people find them out in the woods no water but thinking in the 1000s never know how much gas changed over all them years
     
  2. dale65

    dale65 Active Member

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    20180714_203347.jpg
    I went out looking this morning and
     

  3. dale65

    dale65 Active Member

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    20180714_203524.jpg 20180714_203505.jpg 20180714_203402.jpg 20180714_203410.jpg Not as good as I do most of the Time the cotton is getting to tall to see a lot of them I did find this anyone know what this was used far it fits in you hand perfectly where the worn spots are on it was there where all the arrowheads was
     
  4. Bill Yox

    Bill Yox Well-Known Member

    looks alot like a pitted stone. Usually pecked out in the middle. I used to find bi-pitted stones a lot in NY.
     
  5. bob wendt

    bob wendt indiana, wyoming and kansas

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    tons of those pitted stones in indiana. gets to where we don`t even pick them up anymore, that many. with so many on camp sites no doubt some common utility tool. I suspect for nut cracking maybe?
     
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  6. dale65

    dale65 Active Member

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    Cool it's the first one I have found down there but I figured it was some kind of tool it's a real hard stone just where the intention or on both sides is cool how it fits your fingers perfectly
     
  7. bob wendt

    bob wendt indiana, wyoming and kansas

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    just to give you an idea how time changes things. chesnut trees were the dominant tree and nut crop here,,,, till they all died from an asian fungal disease about 50 years ago. I imagine the native americans might have used chesnut meats as a major food source. now we don`t even know if the nuts are hard to crack. also ash are the #1 wood for woven baskets used by native americans. now that will soon be a thing of the past too. what stone tools might they have used to strip the wood and now with no ash we can`t even imagine what that tool would be used for. one thing for sure, every house or teeppee had use for and probably had many many of those pitted hand stones.
     
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  8. dale65

    dale65 Active Member

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    There was one chestnut tree on my granddads land when I was little he though that's was like gold I guess it was and now he's gone don't know if it's still there or not but I have see one a long time ago and yeah I bet that was one of there main food source how time change things so slow you really never realise it till it's gone
     
  9. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    caveman.jpg
     
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  10. dale65

    dale65 Active Member

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