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Longear sunfish

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by Curtis, Jun 26, 2018.

  1. Curtis

    Curtis Member

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    Anybody know where I can find a paint schedule for one? Thanks
     
  2. Timjo

    Timjo Active Member

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    REdoit.jpg
    I got one here for you, just read the paint and go to it! Click on it to get a good look.
     
    Sotired, 3bears and Steven Klee like this.

  3. Curtis

    Curtis Member

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    That’s just a pic of one? I have a picture of the fish when caught. Not really what I’m looking for.
     
  4. Timjo

    Timjo Active Member

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    Might not be what you are looking for but it's the only thing you need.
     
  5. Mudbat

    Mudbat Well-Known Member

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    Was waiting for this!
     
    Jimmy Lawrence and Sotired like this.
  6. Sotired

    Sotired Active Member

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    Curtis what Timjo is telling you is that to be a real taxidermist you need to be able to look at the fish and see the colors yourself! Interpret for yourself, don't go from someone elses guide book and let them tell you what pre-mixed fancy named colors to use!

    Sorry if that seems harsh, but in my opinion schedules were the worst thing to happen to budding taxidermists. It robbed them of the learning experience of being able to see colors for themselves! To be able to look with a discerning eye, to discover on their own what colors to mix, or blend, or overspray!

    Learn by doing young jedi, it's only paint!!! If you don't like it, it will come off, and you can do it over! Experiment!!!

    ~S
     
  7. Mudbat

    Mudbat Well-Known Member

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    Beside a schedule for a long ear would be near impossible. You ever see many that look the same?
     
  8. Curtis

    Curtis Member

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    Yeah I found a video on you tube that was a big help anyway. Was just looking for ideas.
     
    JUST FISH likes this.
  9. whitetails and fish only

    whitetails and fish only Well-Known Member

    You guys mean to say that paint schedules out there that are by top notch fish taxidermists are not very helpful? It would take years for a beginner to learn the info that is in those printouts. You can use that info and then tweak to the specimens you have. I'm sorry that you did not get the info here that you needed. Good luck Curtis.
     
    JUST FISH likes this.
  10. jemmick

    jemmick Active Member

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    I have to agree w/ mudbat,sotired and timjo on this. I used paint schedules for many years and then all my fish started to look the same. Some sort of green on top , some sort of yellow on the side and , whitish on the bottom. Recently ( last 10 -15 yrs) I have really been looking at good reference pics and taking them myself . My fish business has taken off in a big way and I'm so much prouder of my fish. I find paint scheds an easy way out and a shortcut that leads to complacency. Strive to be better . This is meant as an encouragement, not a scolding. Just trying to help.
     
    Sotired, rwenglish1 and Kerby Ross like this.
  11. JUST FISH

    JUST FISH New Member

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    I found paint schedules a place to start when I was just starting out. Right from the beginning I was using reference photos of each fish. When I started doing customers work I asked for photos of their fish. I had to figure out what to do different from the paint schedule to achieve what I seen in the reference photo I was using. It's not much different than watching one the pricey videos of recent times which I own 6-7 or so. It gives one ideals on how to do things different to achieve the end result.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2018
  12. fishmaster

    fishmaster Well-Known Member

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    Just Fish pretty well sums it up. We have all used paint schedules before but at some point you have to begin to understand the color wheel and what colors to expect when colors overlap. A paint schedule cannot address the beginning background color unless you are starting with white or silver. If you antique with a second color on a replica or have a skin mount that has dried light or dark it will influence how the overlaying colors appear. When I look at Timjo's pic I'd be thinking about how I'm going to produce the patterns, not so much what exact colors they are. I did one of those last year for the World show and they are very difficult fish to pull off. Also, depending on where they are caught the colors and patterns vary greatly.
     
    JUST FISH likes this.
  13. Harum

    Harum Active Member

    Curtis,


    Personally I have never used a paint schedule. However, a paint schedule can be useful for the beginner taxidermist that has limited understanding of painting. A paint schedule is simply one person’s approach to mimicking what they see in a live fish or pic. A person should not feel negative about using a schedule to better their understanding of paint application. A person that plans on using a schedule should compare the application of colors in comparison to a reference picture. This will help them to better understand how color is layered to create a desired effect. By understanding this process a person will be able to look at a fish with a better understanding of its coloring and will no longer need a schedule. Skipping this process can lead you to gaps in your understanding of paint application and in my opinion can lead a person, new to painting, down a mistake ridden path. Some good paint schedules can be found in the Breakthrough magazines. I’m pretty confident you can look up schedules that correlate with magazine issues. Be sure to use them as a training tool. Check out their web site and best of luck.


    -Pete
     
  14. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    How you been Pete?
     
  15. Harum

    Harum Active Member

    Hey Frank,

    Can’t complain. Packing the family in the Winnebago and heading for Yosemite national park tomorrow morning:)

    Hope you and family are doing well.
     
  16. Mudbat

    Mudbat Well-Known Member

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    I can say I’ve never used a paint schedule and I’m very new. Though I have a background in painting so that helps.
    I get asked what colors I use on a fish and this is how I look cause each is so different I can’t remember!
    82B3A795-EDCE-4532-9A97-357BBD7D6E17.jpeg
     
  17. Timjo

    Timjo Active Member

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    So true. After doing so many fish, it comes naturally, and you don't do any one fish the same way..........unless you rely on paint schedules, but what fun is that?

    Schedules are a good start for beginners I suppose; however, you need to remove the training wheels ASAP and maybe get a color wheel and most of all, good reference.
     
    Ron Kelly, Sotired and Steven Klee like this.
  18. Sotired

    Sotired Active Member

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    I have never used a schedule, but I tried a lot of experimenting! Personally, I would really recommend a budding fish taxidermist to take some beginning art classes to learn the fundamentals of color, hue, value and mixing! Learn the "whys" and the "hows" of color BEFORE you start spraying!

    A person doesn't learn from following another's success, but rather from creating their own and innovative one! Follow a schedule if you must. Do what someone else does. Don't dare to be you. Don't dare to be creative! Why risk it? :rolleyes:

    ~S