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gorilla mount

Discussion in 'Lifesize Mammals' started by Museum Man, Oct 3, 2018.

  1. Museum Man

    Museum Man Well-Known Member

    one of the best things I feel I get to do in my lifetime is helping to preserve fine artwork. this is a gorilla mounted by Louis paul Jonas in 1959. it blows away any of the gorilla's mounted by carl Akeley. at sixty years old this mount is still tight at the seams, not one crack anywhere, no gaps from glue separation. up close it is still a stunning mount. I am honored to be able to touch it each year and be a small part of its continuing existence on this planet. hope you all enjoy the photo's. a cleaning and a little paint touch up is all he ever needs. the muscle work on him is fantastic. IMG_0820.JPG IMG_0821.JPG IMG_0819.JPG
     
    rigbobby, EA, OhDear and 19 others like this.
  2. Robert Wise

    Robert Wise Member

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    Thanks for sharing...... Incredible!!!!!! I enjoy looking at those old pieces especially when you think of what they had to work with way back then. Not rushed reading reference skilled hands and the love to get it right. I am a person who is very anal pay attention to the smallest details so I am totally into great pieces. We have a lifesize gorilla in our Carnegie Museum in Pittsburg... Like that done many years ago by an old German taxidermist ...it is amazing as well . Surrounded in glass . You can get very close. I am in Awh every time I see it! The eyes will look right through you straight to your soul ! Unbelievable talent . And looking back on some of the old pictures of Jonas Ankeley look at how they presented themselves while at work Lab coats and ties...speaks for itself ! Thanks again!
     
    rigbobby, OhDear and birddog1964 like this.

  3. Museum Man

    Museum Man Well-Known Member

    the front of the case is taken off for me to access him each time. I check all the seams and do what ever touch up is required along with blowing the dust off him. Louis paul could not have done a better job. this was mounted 30 years after carl Akeley died
     
  4. Robert Wise

    Robert Wise Member

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    Pretty cool indeed!
     
  5. Wildthings

    Wildthings Well-Known Member

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    Completely Awesome
     
  6. wa

    wa Thanks John...this depicts me better

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    very cool you are very lucky too
     
  7. Steven Klee

    Steven Klee Steven Klee Studios

    Fantastic!!
     
  8. rogerswildlife

    rogerswildlife Rogers Wildlife Taxidermy Tommy Rogers

    Absolutely amazing! ! Museum man you are a lucky man to be able to work on such beautiful historical pieces such as this . Thank you so much for sharing!
    Tommy
     
    OhDear likes this.
  9. Skywalker

    Skywalker Well-Known Member

    Wow!
     
    woakley144 likes this.
  10. AZ~Rich

    AZ~Rich " Africa" never fails to satisfy

    Thanks for sharing. That appears to be a great one to study from.
     
  11. Joe Kish

    Joe Kish Well-Known Member

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    Museum Man,

    Thanks for posting these fine pictures. I would be reluctant to understate the quality of Akeley’s gorilla work. In fact he did mentor LPJ for many years. If some of Louis’s work exceeds some of Akeley’s work it’s no surprise. The student is expected to exceed his master if he has equal talent and the same kind of passion for the subject matter and medium. I’m a lifelong museum buff, including heritage museums, agriculture museums, and especially natural history museums. What museum can we visit to see these gorilla mounts in the flesh?

    Bob Wise,

    (Quote) “…when you think of what they had to work with way back then.”

    The longevity of all those masterworks in all the leading museums is a testament to what they had to work with in a by-gone era - plaster, burlap, organic adhesives, and acetate, were and are still as good as any of today’s synthetics to achieve the two vital criteria in taxidermy - realism and permanence. Furthermore, it’s practically an axiom in commercial taxidermy to use the least expensive materials to get the job done right.
     
  12. Museum Man

    Museum Man Well-Known Member

    sent you a long pm joe....
     
  13. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Great work from an old master. Would not doubt that a good application of arsenic keeps the bugs away too. Thanks for sharing.
     
  14. thanks that great.
     
  15. Arsenic only works when it is eaten by the bugs. Still a great mount!
     
  16. Joe Kish

    Joe Kish Well-Known Member

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    Museum man,

    Yes, I received your email. Thanks for letting me know where that boss gorilla resides - the St. Louis Science Ctn. Too bad it’s held in storage most of the time. I made it a point to visit this forum and discovered that wa certainly can do.

    Mr. wa,

    There are those that talk the talk, but you sir have shown with this bobcat that you can walk the walk. The exceptional ear-work and eye-set, the perfectly groomed facial ruff and the overall posture are a testament to your mastery of taxidermy and the subject. Photo shoot this specimen in a woodland setting and I doubt one in a hundred would suspect that it’s not a live critter. (Pardon me for previously messing with your handle [icon]).

    Ms Cody,

    I presume that you are working and learning unassisted by a coach or mentor (someone like wa for instance.) Please correct me if I’m mistaken. At risk of offering unsolicited suggestions, if you’re not working from carcass sketches now, learn to do it soon.* Pose the carcass in the pose you wish to mount the skin and pencil trace around the profile, including legs, feet and head. The sketch will show you the profile exactly lifesize and will act as a template against which you can compare the form you are carving or wrapping. In this way you will avoid the mistake of a poor neck connection such as on your bobcat shown here. Otherwise, the general anatomy, the skin work and grooming on this piece is quite well done. The head is especially good for size, shape and character.

    Lastly, that handsome piece of driftwood doesn’t work for this mount. It’s too complex and is more of a distraction than an enhancement.

    *See article in Breakthrough Magazine, Issue 118, Summer 2015 “Sketching: The Key to Improving Your Work” by Joe Kish
     
  17. OhDear

    OhDear New Member

    Long ago, when I was a little, mum would drop me off at Carnegie when she'd go shopping in Pittsburgh. I credit that collection for my life long love of taxidermy....and in a dim back corner there was a not so great gorilla mount - without eyes for some reason (just white cotton like bird study skins) - that I credit for endless nightmares. Regardless, that museum is a treasured memory- Thank you for mentioning them!
     
    Robert Wise likes this.
  18. Western Wildlife Art Studio

    Western Wildlife Art Studio STUDIO PHONE (406) 356-2100

    Superb ,, love the detail. Thanks for sharing this masterpiece .
     
  19. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

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    beautiful realistic mount ... just wondering though we have some gorillas in our zoo but dont tecall them having such a shiny face thats all he needs a nipple piercing next time you open case
     
  20. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    Beautiful mount! Thanks for sharing! It's amazing to see something that old in that great condition! A true taxidermy masterpiece!