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How Do I "put Up" Green Hides For Taxidermy (full-mount Fur-bearing Animals)

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Jason Cox, Dec 3, 2018.

  1. Jason Cox

    Jason Cox Member

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    Hello, I recently had a hide go bad in transit and was forced to replace it because it started to loose hair in the shipping process. Yes, it was frozen in an insulated package and I sent it in a large flat-rate box. To battle this, for my longer shipments (3-day or longer), I would like to offer my clients a fleshed, dried, and salted option, and I know it is possible to do this with the paws on the hide and with the proper skull measurements. Are their any resources that show a detailed instructional concerning how to properly skin and dry fur-bearing animals for life-size mounting and take the proper skull measurements?
     
  2. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    You're going to have to remove those paws all the way to the toenail/claw. Meat is what spoils a hide and causes hair to slip. Every sliver of meat you leave on a hide risks just what you had happen to you. By the way, that means the tail as well.
     
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  3. Jason Cox

    Jason Cox Member

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    What about the pads...do I leave the pads on? There doesnt seem to be a good way to flesh the pads. And I know everything doesnt have to be removed if it dries before it goes bad...we leave all rhe meat on the faces of our coyotes and dry it out fast...and get no hair loss. So I know ot doesnt have to be completly clean...A taxidermist can rehydrate the hide amd finish fleashing itas long as ot wasnt rotton before it was dried...I know fur buyers that do it all the time. They buy dried, poorly fleshed hides...rehydrate them...finish fleshing them...and redry them for resale to buyers that wont touch any fur with any hair loss. I just need to knlw how to make the right cuts so that I can get them dried and cured properly for taxidermy.
     
  4. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Jason, as a trapper and a taxidermist I will tell you that how things are done for taxidermy and the fur market is almost entirely different. In the fur industry, the only reason they even look at the head is to try to get an indication of how well you may know how to put up fur. Have you ever won any top lot awards? If you flesh off whisker butts or mess up the eyes, they will dock you, even though they don't use those parts typically. Now onto salting or drying furs. Rehydrating trapper dried furs is a pain in the arse, from my experience but rehydrating a salt dried fur is pretty easy. I'm not sure how they do it for the fur industry but I can tell you I'm sure they plan on some loss during that stage. They do not want salt dried fur for the fur industry, the salt is hard on mechanical equipment and it also has a way of drawing moisture out of the air, dried fur can sit for months in a warehouse on the coast, that means disaster for the fur dealers. Now onto your original question, you need to figure out how, when and with whom to ship frozen skins or even fully prep and tan furs for your best chances of selling to taxidermists. I cannot buy raw furs from anyone but a licensed fur buyer/seller. Many folks prefer different incisions depending on critter and pose they have planned so you can either sell whole critters or ask the buyer before skinning to their preference. Measurements can be seen in a taxidermy catalog such as McKenzie's. It shows you where to measure. Skinning, splitting, fleshing and salting are very important parts of a good taxidermy mount and need to be done correct but are also time consuming and tedious. I suggest you watch some videos whether on line or purchased of how to prep mammals for taxidermy, there are some differences among them but many of the basics are the same and then practice, practice. Prepping fur for the market is easy, not so for taxidermy.
     
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  5. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    If I was buying a dried green specimen for taxidermy, I would expect it to be salt dried with zero meat and fat on the skin. Salt dried meat is a pain to rehydrate and flesh to say the least. In fact I quit taking in deer heads for customers if they brought me salt dried the capes with any meat left on it.
    The eyes, nose, and ears should be turned and split.
    I would prefer a frozen pelt to a salt dried one if any meat was to be left on.
     
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  6. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Thanks guys, that about covers it. I will comment on the face issue. Fur dealers don't use faces, lips, and ears; taxidermists do.
     
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  7. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    You are correct George, most often critters are cut into strips and then sewn together to make garments. There does tend to be some of the critter not utilized.
     
    Jason Cox likes this.
  8. Jason Cox

    Jason Cox Member

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    Thanks guys, that clears up alot of things for me. And, no...I wont be doing that...Frozen or nothing...I dont have that kind of skill yet...Yet...I thank you all for taking the time to answer my questions!
     
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  9. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    You are welcome. There are a few good sellers on here that seem to have it figured out but, I'm not sure they are willing to share their secrets for selling to taxidermists, it is a small market after all. Good luck.
     
    Jason Cox likes this.
  10. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

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    best to keep frozen whole and ship 2nd day express anyone who wants a good specimen will pay the cost never never never trust in the " flat rate" priority boxes have had more stuff lost in those than basically in standard ground shipments , so spend your time learning to wrap, insulate, and ship. plastic, tin foil, fiberglass batt .... 3 bears I buy dozens of fur animals every year dirrect from trappers, you need to get your regs verified
     
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  11. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    byrdman, I do have my regs right, just because you do it doesn't make it legal. It use to be legal.
     
  12. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

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    are you a licensed and registered state taxidermist? I do it legally , the only ones you cant are the martens otters and cats
     
  13. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I am, now please show me a rule book you go by. I've been wrong before so if you can show me where you get your info from and it proves to be accurate I will admit I am wrong again. It specifically states that the pelts of all protected fur bearers can only be sold to a licensed fur buyer. Are you one? I doubt you pay the large fee for a fur buyer license and keep the required log, which is from what I hear, a pain in the ass, just to mount a few weasels.
     
  14. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

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    read the reg book only pelts or skins but anyone can buy or sell whole carcass animals as they are considered as meat animals as well as fur squirrel rabbit muskrat beaver possum coon also unprotected coyote skunk(striped) porky chucks gophers chips and up until this year weasels also if you have any buddies that hunt fox red or gray. I had fur licenses in past to buy bobcat and lynx but got all I needed of minn cats so dropped the permit its only a 1,000 bond but you get that back. There is better cats from kansas new york dealers that sell for the same as what trappers here want.kind of stupid that they listed weasel but the state ag guy told me they just wanted the extra revenue from the guys that were long lining them without licenses.
     
  15. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    byrdman, I think I see where you are going with this but, I still don't read it that way in the book. I interpret it as no wild game meat can be sold, only inedible parts except for some of what you listed and then the meat can be sold to anyone but the hide must be sold to a fur buyer, if they are listed as a fur bearer. Back when fur buyers bought "in the round" taxidermists could buy critters. Either way it doesn't make any difference to me. I don't buy any critters to mount, I don't have time for that. I won't be competing for that business. The next time I see the guy that would write me the summons, I'll ask him what he interprets it as.