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Discussion in 'Bird Taxidermy' started by drwalleye, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. drwalleye

    drwalleye Member

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    I did my 4th pheasant the other day and when trying to run the wires down the legs they started to fall apart. the scales started to come loose and one of the spurs actually popped off. I was holding it firm while twisting the wire in so its not like I was tearing at the legs. and I think I had 14 ga wire. thanks for any help
     
  2. Jim McNamara

    Jim McNamara Well-Known Member

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    It happens sometimes. Make sure the leg is fully rehydrated before running wires. You can glue the scale patch back on as well the spur.
     

  3. BrookeSFD16

    BrookeSFD16 Well-Known Member

    Best tip I enev got at a convention was from Mike Orthrober. When you go to put in your leg wire take the wire and run it over a bar of soap. Of course you want to sharpen the point of your wire also, but running the wire over the bar of soap is key. I've since done every leg wire like that...even 6 gauge for Turkey and it makes a HUGE difference!
     
  4. Crittrstuffr

    Crittrstuffr Member

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    You can also cut the pad of the heel of the foot. Take a wire or an upholsterers tool (Long spike looking thing with a plastic handle) and hook the tendons that run down the leg to the heel area and pull them down through the bottom of the foot and that will open up a channel for the wire to slip right through.
     
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  5. Another thing that you can try is instead of sharpening your wire to a point cut at an angle with a wire cutter and twist as you reach resistance. A wire with this kind of point will help to cut through the tendons.
     
    drwalleye likes this.
  6. Thanks brooke,will have to try that now :)
     
  7. BrookeSFD16

    BrookeSFD16 Well-Known Member

    It works wonders! No more fighting and twisting. I've got a groove in my bar of soap almost half way through now. And on the occasion I forget to do it I know it almost instantly and I'll I'll pull the wire back out and run it over the soap. Slides right in.
     
    magicmick likes this.
  8. Wildthings

    Wildthings Well-Known Member

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    What brand soap?
     
  9. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Cutting the heel was a method we used in years past. If you sharpen the wire, that's not necessary. The spur popping off leads me to believe your tried running the wire down the spur side of the leg. I always go down the other. It also sounds like the leg had spoiled and had been left out too long. I've never had what happened to you as I flesh and wire quickly. Also, 14 gauge wire sounds a bit thin to me. I used 12 most times and then 10 on standing birds. I also never ran a wire out the heel of the foot. It's easy to just bend that middle toe down and continue to push the wire until you're near that last toe joint. Then push the wire out. This allows for you to have the pheasant "walking" in a natural way with the heel lifted.
     
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  10. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

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    y
    either way the tendons absolutly have to come out or your bird is gonna stink...
     
  11. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Why does the birds I did over 20 years ago when I was beginning not stink? Their tendons were not removed.
     
  12. Wildthings

    Wildthings Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I don't remove the tendons and I have no stink either!
     
  13. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

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    pull the tendons on your next bird and take a whiff..... you might not smell them when dried but guarantee mice beetles etc all do
     
    Wildthings likes this.
  14. BrookeSFD16

    BrookeSFD16 Well-Known Member

    Any bar of soap.

    My opinion on the tendons depends on what you are injecting with. I've never removed the tendons but I inject with formaldehyde/glycerin. Masters blend has zero preservatives. It's basically foam. So I can see if that's what you are using then yes the thick tendons in upland birds may rot and stink.
     
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  15. bucksnort10

    bucksnort10 Well-Known Member

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    thanks Brooke for the advice, I will try it on the next one
     
  16. bucksnort10

    bucksnort10 Well-Known Member

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    Curious George if you would be so kind as to share a photo of one of your recent bird mounts, Thanks!
     
  17. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Byrdman, what the hell are you smoking. TENDONS? STINKING? I've read some bullship on here but that one is close to the top.

    Comments about beetles are simply ludicrous. The beetles who would attack a bird are not interested in the tendons. They're more intent on fat and meat residue. They will attack the bird's skin underneath the feathers, in the legs and in the wings. Then there are the dust mites that will simply love to shred the feather barbules
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019 at 6:48 PM
  18. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Brown Leghorn Rooster.jpg
    Bucksnort, I don't have anything "recent". I'm retired now but let me look.

    The wire runs down that center toe into the plowshare. The legs are the birds own, the tendons WERE NOT PULLED and that bird has been mounted for about 10 years and DOES NOT SMELL.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019 at 10:43 PM
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  19. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Woodie with black-eyed Susans.jpg
     
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  20. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Bald Eagle.JPG

    The eagle has the wire in the right foot through the toe but the left leg runs through the heel so as to also hold the white perch in place. The eagle's natural tendency to close its talons worked in my favor on the fish.
     
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