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Dakota Pro Fleshing Time

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by Sam Cripps, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. Sam Cripps

    Sam Cripps New Member

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    Looking at getting the Dakota Pro Flesher. The thing I'm most curious about is the time it would save me. I'm excluding fleshing heads etc as each one can take more time than the other, but the full hides are pretty equal for an easy comparison. What would you say is an average time to flesh a whitetail hide?
     
  2. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Are you wanting to know the FLESHING time or the THINNING of a pickled cape time or BOTH?
     

  3. Sam Cripps

    Sam Cripps New Member

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    Fleshing time only. The main reason would be for rugs so thinning wouldn't be necessary.
     
  4. Terry Bennett

    Terry Bennett Active Member

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    Idaho
    I have a dakota pro that I shave pickled skins with. I wouldn't buy one just for fleshing deer flats. I can flesh a deer flat on my fleshing beam and a good old fashion two handled fleshing knife in 10 or fifteen minutes.
     
  5. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I fleshed with one. I still beamed all the chunks of meat and fat off, then fleshed and thinned with the Dakota Pro before going to the tanning procedures. It didn't save me much time, however, it made a much cleaner skin.

    Why wouldn't you thin a skin for a rug? Tanneries do it. I do it.
     
  6. Sam Cripps

    Sam Cripps New Member

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    There’s a good chance I’ll be doing more than just the hide of a whitetail and a few things the Dakota Pro would save time on vs the knife. The main reason for just keeping the question simple was for the reasons you guys haven’t answered the question but have questioned me. Thinning. Well it all depends on how thin you want it. Etc etc. Thats why I just asked for the time to flesh only. So I can compare the time easier.
     
  7. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Hand beaming a mule deer cape, about 20 minutes.

    Removing the chunks of meat and fat with the draw knife on the beam, which, you must do before using the Dakota Pro, then using the Dakota Pro after meat and fat chunks removal about 20 minutes.

    I thin as I flesh so it may take a tiny bit longer than if I didn't.
     
  8. Sam Cripps

    Sam Cripps New Member

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    Perfect answer! Thank you!