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Using Denatured Alcohol After Pickling

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Maddmartagan, Jan 30, 2019.

  1. Maddmartagan

    Maddmartagan New Member

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    I have been messing around with tanning some squirrels that I have with the intention of mounting them. I have read alot about using Denatured Alcohol as an alternative to tanning for smaller mammals. I wanted to go ahead and practice mounting one of the squirrels with out going through the whole tanning process, but was wondering if there is any issue with just taking one of the pelts I currently have in the pickle and putting it in some DA and then mounting?

    Also, I see there seems to be a debate on whether DA can be used for mounting, but can anyone give a specific reason they would not use it? It seems like a no brainer if your only intention is to mount the animal. You just stick it in DA for a few days and then mount as opposed to going through all of the tanning steps. Does it not last as long? Shrink more? Cost more overall? Just want to know the cons, assuming it works.

    Thanks!
     
  2. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    If you have them in a pickle solution now, Why would you not finish tanning them? To use DA now seems goofy to me. Tan them.
     

  3. Maddmartagan

    Maddmartagan New Member

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    Mostly because I have limited time for the next few weeks to mess around with them. I am just getting started tanning and am still getting it down. Instead of having to take them out of the pickle, make a neutralizing solution, neutralize them, make a tanning solution, put them in tanning solution, put oil on them and then let them dry and stretch them, etc, I want to just throw one of them in DA for a day, take it out and practice mounting.
     
  4. Fallenscale

    Fallenscale Active Member

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    Main reason is health reason to me . Be sure to wear rubber gloves. And keep it in a well vented area.
     
  5. Maddmartagan

    Maddmartagan New Member

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    I would think the same health risks and safety precautions would apply when dealing with pickling and tanning acids/solutions as well though, right?
     
  6. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Depending on what or where you plan to do or go with this, maybe skip the whole tanning process and DP them, many pros do that with tree rats. You can, skin flesh and mount in the same day. Your first attempts are probably going to be less than great anyway, unless you are a prodigy. When you have time, then try to figure out correct tanning procedures and improve your game.
     
  7. Maddmartagan

    Maddmartagan New Member

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    Yes that is what I will probably do initially, but I wanted to soak in the DA for a bit to make sure the hair sets and avoid any slippage. So just want to make sure that the pickle won't react in a weird way with the DA.
     
  8. Fallenscale

    Fallenscale Active Member

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    The DA will help it from slippage. Cost wise it cheaper Imo to just tan. But I know you can get DA from the hardware store.
     
  9. Mike Powell

    Mike Powell Well-Known Member

    I would be hesitant to put a pickled tan into DA. I’m thinking as well that the different chemicals may react together in an undesirable fashion.
     
  10. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    HOLD THE PHONE! Seems everyone is attacking this from the wrong angle. In the 1950s, the "pickle tan" was the entire process. In other words, a skin was taken out of the pickle, washed off, dried, and mounted. A pickle eliminates any FURTHER hair slippage. Denatured alcohol does exactly the same thing. It's an astringent and closes the pores of the skin locking the hair in. If you're going to use DA on small game, just use it. Dry Preservative will do the same thing without the risk of fumes but it's a trade off as unless you wear gloves, dermatitis is a strong possibility.
     
    cyclone likes this.
  11. Mike Powell

    Mike Powell Well-Known Member

    That’s more what I was thinking George. Once you’ve done one, why do the other? I see no benefit, because they are essentially doing the same thing, but I raised the question “could those different chemicals negatively affect the other?” as a warning, not out of any personal knowledge or experience, but the lack thereof.
     
    George likes this.