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Bass Repainted With Water Base (wb)

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by Marvtaxidermy, May 2, 2019.

  1. Marvtaxidermy

    Marvtaxidermy New Member

    27
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    This is a bass that I caught and mounted over 30 yrs ago. Switching to WB paint so repainted with WB. The dots gave me fits, I found that thinning the paint down as with Laquer for the dots does not work the WB wants to splatter very slightly with the dots. I'm thinking it is because the WB sets up slower than Laquer. Ended up just mixing 30% retard with paint straight out of the bottle and turning down to 20 psi did the trick. Messed up a few initially but finally got them going. Overall was pretty pleased any critique, suggestions.
     

    Attached Files:

    Fallenscale likes this.
  2. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    ok I bet you thought lacquer works with any paints and you found it doesn't. You need to use the products designed for waterbase paints as you would have done with lacquers.
    Each has it's own thinners, and retarders , neither can be mixed properly or be compatible.
    Look into those products and you'll find it works better.
    Just remember that by switching over to waterbase paints doesn't mean its safer to use over lacquer. Once airborne it has the same hazards as lacquers. So wear a mask etc.
     

  3. Hey Frank I seen I guy that looks like you walking around the plaza hotel,lol.
     
  4. jigginjim

    jigginjim Active Member

    Have you checked out the pan pastels yet? small microbrushes worked nice to add small spots on bass and other fish, even adding the spots on sunfish stripes that can break up edges the not look like a straight line airbrushed.
     
    Sotired likes this.
  5. Clew

    Clew Help a child, Build our future

    Get rid of paint for the spots
    Use vine charcoal
     
    Kerby Ross and Sotired like this.
  6. Marvtaxidermy

    Marvtaxidermy New Member

    27
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    Would like to get away from paint for the spots. What technique to use, lightly touch the top of each scale? Surely there is a trick to it. Anything on line to look at? Thanks
     
  7. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Vine charcoal is a solid choice for those spots. You can blow off the markings if you don't like and do over. Only "trick" I can think of is to NOT seal your fish as this will make it harder for things like charcoal to grab. And maybe another "trick" would be to not use the point of the vine charcoal. Hold it like a paint brush and use the end/edge, not a point. Just the way I've done those spots.
     
    Sotired likes this.
  8. Marvtaxidermy

    Marvtaxidermy New Member

    27
    3
    The Vine Charcoal worked great, thanks so much! I rubbed on from the side of the Vine Charcoal and then lightly whiped with finger and very happy with results. Also, does this work good on crappie with all of their many spots, assume you must paint the spots on their tails?
     
    FishArt likes this.
  9. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Yes, vine charcoal does work on other species as well including most Crappie. A lot depends on your reference and how sharp and dark the spots are though. For crappie sometimes I use a trimmed artists brush and thinned black paint and dab the spots on. And yes, I use this technique on the fin and tail markings as well. Another technique for crappie markings that I came up with is I also use the Derwent WC pencils for the darker, sharper upper markings too. Dip in water and let the "black" pool with the fish setting on it's side so gravity doesn't let it run. Kind've a natural way to let the color flow in between the scales, etc. for a more realistic look w/o any noticeable strokes...
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2019
    Sotired likes this.
  10. Clew

    Clew Help a child, Build our future

    I put that $hite on everything