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Wet Or Dry Thawing?

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by SterlingFoxCreations, Nov 13, 2019.

  1. SterlingFoxCreations

    SterlingFoxCreations New Member

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    I've been looking for a definitive answer but have instead been finding conflicting ones. From your own experience with whole frozen carcasses, is it better to thaw them at room temp on a towel, or is it better to put them in a room temperature pickling solution before skinning? I am primarily asking for smaller critters such as squirrels, raccoons, and foxes to try to reduce slippage on fresh critters. If you recommend dry thawing, do you spray/apply any solution to the carcass such as isopropyl? Would it be better to thaw slowly in the refrigerator or thaw at room temperature?

    Any experienced recommendations would be appreciated.
     
  2. Monte

    Monte Missouri fur-Limited hair-tanning

    Thaw them out in an alum pickle use 8 ounces of high-grade salt and 8 ounces of aluminum sulfate for each gallon of water makes up enough to totally submerge the specimen
     
    PensivePronghorn likes this.

  3. SterlingFoxCreations

    SterlingFoxCreations New Member

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    Do you think a mixture of borax and salt in water might work as well?
     
  4. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    No don’t use borax as it raises the pH and causes slippage.
    Personally I don’t thaw anything in a pickle for it renders it useless.
    I thaw many different ways but I do use stop rot on the face especially fox anything else may get thawed on my table or fridge depending on when I get get to it. Do whatever works for you as we all are different on how we choose to thaw
     
    MixedupMel likes this.
  5. SterlingFoxCreations

    SterlingFoxCreations New Member

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    I have heard that denatured alcohol can be used as cheaper and more easily available to stop rot. Is this true?
     
  6. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    Alcohol does work but stop rot changes the skin structure on the animal. It’s two different products and I use a lot less stop rot than alcohol. if you do a search on it and look under the maker Glen Conley you’ll find why we use it.
    there’s a lot of great reading on it. if you really want to prevent, change the skin structure get it.
    you can even do one of the tests that was done. Take a piece of chicken fat wet it with alcohol and do another with stop rot. Go from your own conclusions.
     
    MixedupMel likes this.