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Can You Macerate After Simmering?

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by Tnrandy, Dec 8, 2019.

  1. Tnrandy

    Tnrandy Member

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    We are in the process of switching to maceration instead of simmering. We have a whitetail skull that we simmered, power washed and got most of the meat off but still some left. Can I put it in maceration to get rest of it off?
     
  2. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    Yes! The bacteria will go right to work on it. You might expedite the process by mixing some water from a raw skull that has been soaking a few days with the water for the cooked skull. Either way, if the temperature is right, the bacteria will clean it.
     

  3. Tnrandy

    Tnrandy Member

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    Great! Since this maceration is new to us what difference should we expect from the simmer method as far as cleaning and degreasing? Will we still need to power wash a little when it’s completed maceration? Will we need to degrease longer? Any thing?
     
  4. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    When totally macerated, rinse them off, and place in an ammonia/dawn solution that is around 110-115 degrees for a few weeks. Most deer skulls have minimal oil in them after maceration. Bear and hog skulls can take months
     
  5. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    You will have no need to powerwash anything if done correctly because there is nothing left. Degrease, whiten and you are done. At most, rinse the skull with a hose and put into the degreaser. When you rinse out your maceration bucket, do it carefully as loose teeth will be in the bottom. I pour off half, fill again and wait a few seconds for things to settle, repeat a couple of times till what is in the bucket is water and any heavier bits on the bottom. Then I pour that off very slowly and what is left in the bottom I pour into a tray and recover teeth .. and even bullet fragments. When working with carnivores, some teeth can get to be very tiny. Maceration even cleans out the tooth sockets so teeth will loosen and fall out. Make sure you remove as much tissue as possible including the eyes and especially the brain before starting. The raw brain is easy to break up with a stick and rinse out with a hose .. or brain blaster. If you haven't seen the tutorials on here they will show up if you use the Search function. Here is one. https://www.taxidermy.net/threads/338002/

    Biggest difference is that maceration **stinks**. Bad, you can't get around it but you can control it some. But while your skulls are cleaning themselves you have plenty of time to do something else. Degreasing time is shortened hugely.
     
  6. Tnrandy

    Tnrandy Member

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    Great thanks for all the info