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Cost Of Shipping Kills Part 2

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by Pikeonthefly, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. Pikeonthefly

    Pikeonthefly Active Member

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    Update. I still say shipping costs are outrageous but I want to be fair and present all sides. I received my foam today and maybe with it an obvious explanation. For those of you who have ordered carving foam you have probably found that it is very difficult to get out of the box because it fit so tight. Such was not the case here. So I did some measuring and here's what I come up with.
    This box measures 36.5 " tall x 25" wide x 16" deep and guessed weight 15#'s. Per UPS charge it should be $79.54
    The foam itself measures 36" tall x 20" wide x 10" deep and guessed weight 15#'s. Per UPS charge it would be $49.80
    I was charged $90.00. I did receive a reply to my email I sent the day I discovered the charge and to their credit they have offered a slight refund but I replied and let them know I would expect a little more. Their offer is about 1/3rd of what it should be. I'll keep you informed. Maybe they have a newbie that just grabbed a mannikin box off the shelf and tossed the foam in it unaware of the cost differences in shipping? Sometimes even that extra half inch can add a lot of cost. I feel it should be in their best interest to minimize the box sizes as much as possible to look out for their customers. Blue foam.jpg
     
  2. h20halo

    h20halo New Member

    have you considered buying pourable foam and doing it yourself. I've used it often in boat building and its very easy to work with and you can pour a rectangular shape the size of the form you need to start with. For 67 bucks at us composites you get 4 cubic feet of 4 lb. foam. I'm in michigan so its easy to find locally because of all the automotive and marine manufacturing here, but i've ordered from us composites as well.
     
    Kerby Ross likes this.

  3. Pikeonthefly

    Pikeonthefly Active Member

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    I have not. Does it have the same carving qualities as that of the blue foam? I was sent a box of that yellow foam once and found it to be soft and very fine dust when sanded. It made for a nice mount but you really had to be careful.
     
  4. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    For me the Dow Billets purchased locally were simply too much of savings to not put up with the dust. Nothing I have found is nearly as cost-effective for fish bodies and it's great for carving. You just gotta deal with the dust. I would batch my body carvings so I only cleaned up once.
     
  5. Pikeonthefly

    Pikeonthefly Active Member

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    Good advice. I've seen your mounts. No argument here. I'll give this and the pourable foam a try. Always looking to better myself. Thank you!
     
    FishArt likes this.
  6. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Thank you for the compliment. Foam's the same price even if my work was crappy - lol! ;)
     
  7. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    As far as pouring and carving, LaVerne Miller that lives up the road and does excellent fish mounts (National Award winner) pours his foam, but does it a little differently to economize the amount of waste foam. I have't tried it, but he claims he lays a plastic bag on his kids sand box. Then takes the fish he will be mounting and compresses it on the plastic bag until he has a depression comparable to the fish he is mounting. After that he removes the fish and pours the foam into the depression, and from there carves his bodies.

    Anybody else do this? We have a liquid foam suppler not far from us so the shipping of the foam is not to expensive. You can order whatever density you want.
     
    Sotired likes this.
  8. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

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    quit carving ages ago too much dust... you can buy most any commercial form and shave it down to fit in a few minutes
     
  9. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Not sure about that byrdman. Unless you don't do any trout and salmon? Cold water fish vary too much for commercial forms. And, I'm too cheap. It's too expensive to buy commercial forms and unless you can get a very close fit w/o too much trimming or possibly having to add material it certainly isn't saving much time. If any. You have to include taking measurements, locating the form, having to put your skin in the freezer, trimming the form or adding material... To each his own here, but I prefer NOT relying on distributors amap either. JMO...
     
    Sotired likes this.
  10. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    I agree with Marty. I use commercial forms when I can on bass, walleye, pike, musky, etc. and use the half cast method for my panfish. However for the trout and salmon, which vary a lot, I carve the bodies as it seems it's hard to get a perfect fit. I do purchase commercial heads for the trout and salmon as it's more economical for me than to cast my own. (Time involved.) JMO too.
     
    FishArt likes this.
  11. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    The Leach/Caribou heads are VERY nice too!