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Tiny Coyote Bones Causing Me Grief... Help!

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by TMF Berry, Feb 19, 2020.

  1. TMF Berry

    TMF Berry New Member

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    Unsurprisingly, the feet are causing me consternation. Some of the tiny bones (carpals I can’t identify? Imposters sent to make me second guess everything about my hobby choices?) are just not fitting into the puzzle very well. For my own skeletons, I don’t stress if there’s a bone missing in the feet, but this specimen is destined for educational display at our local nature center and I want it to be right.

    Here are some pictures. I’m befuddled by this gap under the scapholunar on the front paw. I could have sworn I had the trapezoid in the right place, but that space just seems wrong.

    Then, I have 5 sets of smallish bones I simply cannot place. I use the Atlas of Animal Anatomy for Artists and the Bible of newbie bone building by Lee Post. But I’m in need of more help! Help, forum friends!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member


  3. TMF Berry

    TMF Berry New Member

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    Well, that got bookmarked immediately in my browser! Great resource! And it will help me puzzle out those pesky sesamoid bones in the next step. Thank you so much!

    As for the cleaning, here’s what we did:
    • Wrapped it loosely in a trash bag and some chicken wire and left it outside for a few weeks to let the bugs and little beasties do their thing.
    • Warm water to degrease- this was tricky since it was a big, old male coyote and the leg bones and jaw were a greasy mess. I had to drill some holes in the larger leg bones to help the grease escape. Yuk.
    • Hydrogen peroxide for a while to make them whiter (I used the clear 20 from the beauty supply)
    • Repaired the broken bones (the pelvis and back leg were pretty shattered from being hit by the car) and holes from degreasing with epoxy putty.
    • Gave it a coat of matte polycrylic to finish up.
    Now it’s on to assembly!

    Have you done any coyote’s any other suggestions?
     
  4. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Pretty much macerated it which will also get rid of a lot of grease. Warm water and detergent mixed in? Drilling the larger, long bones is a plus due to the trapped marrow. If you do another, separate the 4 limbs and macerate individually. Reduces the amount of bone bits to puzzle out. Start with the freshest carcass you can get and flesh as much as possible. You can macerate in 5 gallon plastic buckets and you will recover all bones, including the inner ear bones. It will still stink but, if you cut off as much as possible first, it is a lot less mess.
     
  5. TMF Berry

    TMF Berry New Member

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    a very good point! That fleshing is gross, especially since roadkill isn’t always the freshest... but worth it if I can find a good carcass. Thanks again!