1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Bondo Vs. Ear Liners And Why?

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Dennis Duffy, Feb 22, 2020.

  1. AZ~Rich

    AZ~Rich " Africa" never fails to satisfy

    Removing the cartilage allows you to open the pockets all the way out to the edges which gives generally gives you more detail and reduces any edge curl when drying. Plus, without cartilage the pocket can more easily accommodate your liner, facilitating its insertion...your not fighting with a more rigid/reduced space. Moving the adhesives around to distribute evenly can be controlled more effectively without cartilage. Bondo can be used effectively by talented folks but many ears I have seen done that way just don’t seem to measure up to what can be achieved with liners. Personally, I like the prolonged workability with liners as I’m always tweaking things for the first several hours anyway. Whereas, Bondo requires you have it right before you mount it up.
     
    Kerby Ross, 13 point and HondaXR250 like this.
  2. Glenn M

    Glenn M Well-Known Member

    Learn to use both methods for the reasons George described. Earliner's are definitely better for your health than breathing bondo fumes
     
    tem likes this.

  3. 13 point

    13 point Well-Known Member

    THIS
     
    HondaXR250 likes this.
  4. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Cartilage will want to curl up as it dries, where as skin doesn't want to curl up as much. If you use Bondo, it cures so fast, it won't let the cartilage curl up if it was done right and you are good to go. Since a liner won't curl and is more rigid, it becomes in effect an artificial cartilage that can't curl. I have had Bondo ears curl un-naturally because I spread the Bondo too thin. Usually the Bondo will be thicker than glue on a liner.

    So, removal of the cartilage makes sense because then you are just replacing cartilage with an artificial one.
     
    HondaXR250 likes this.
  5. HondaXR250

    HondaXR250 Active Member

    252
    238
    Ohio
    Would removing the cartilage at the base, and leaving the thin paper like cartilage inside the ear be good enough? I havent tried removing any cartilage yet. By the time im done turning an ear, im so frustrated, i cant imagine doing the cartilage.
     
  6. 13 point

    13 point Well-Known Member

    If your using a detailed ear liner , you don’t use the bottom of the ear canal , and taking the thin cartilage off is easy . After you turn the ear go bout 3/8 inch down from the notch of ear , cutting up on an angle cutting ear butt off completely just above where it upward. Then just bend ear in half and lightly cut the cartilage but not thru ear skin , then just start pulling the cartilage off . It’s really not that hard , just make sure ear skin is wet/damp , if dry you will rip the skin of the ear . If that happens it’s an easy fix , take a used dryer sheet cut a strip to fit tear , turn ear insideout putting skin back together and first put some super glue gel down then lay that dryer strip cut on top and press it down into glue with a small tool , I use one end of my lip tucking tool . Let dry in mins your good to go , no stitching required.
     
    HondaXR250 likes this.
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Life Sucks.....Then comes the death roll!!!!

    20,230
    4,226
    Alabama
    Nonsense!! I have been breathing Bondo fumes two to five times a day for 35 years and neither me nor that big purple dancing bear that lives in my shop have shown any ill effects!!!
     
    Mike Powell, Clew, Wildthings and 6 others like this.
  8. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

    6,631
    817
    the cartilage has all the detail built-in bondo can be done very thin if you sqeeze it out
     
    tem likes this.
  9. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    If the cartilage removal is really getting you frustrated and your Bondo ears look good, I would do Bondo. It's not worth the frustration if the Bondo works for you.

    Cartilage removal does get easier with time and practice.
     
    HondaXR250 likes this.
  10. HondaXR250

    HondaXR250 Active Member

    252
    238
    Ohio
    Ive just never tried any of the liners. Everything i mount is for myself, so i dont have to worry about customers. But im very picky on certain things. I might give it a try. Worse case, i dont like it and use bondo.
     
  11. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Yep, the best time to try new stuff is on you own stuff.

    The blacktail and some mule deer ears that I did were real stubborn to turn let alone to remove the cartilage. I would get frustrated killing my thumbs trying to remove it and all it was doing is ripping skin and the cartilage is coming off in tiny chunks. Out comes the Bondo and I could get on with it.
     
  12. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    The dancing bear in my shop is pink, LOL!!!!
     
    John C and msestak like this.
  13. Ron B

    Ron B Life Sucks.....Then comes the death roll!!!!

    20,230
    4,226
    Alabama
    Mine can change colors....depending on the seasons, but its dancing about does clutter up my shop! My wife blames it on me!!!! She never seems to come in when its there!!
     
    John C, Glenn M and joeym like this.
  14. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    To answer your question about why. Have you ever looked at a raisin? Well, it was once a full sized grape. When you don't remove the cartilage, there are 3 layers of flesh inside; front, back, and cartilage. The first thing that happens during decomposition is that the glutens in the skin form a glue. That glue welds the skin to the cartilage on both sides. Because the ear is a convex/concave flesh structure the back skin will attempt to draw the front skin back while the front works in reverse. Eventually, the ear dries in a crumbled mess just like a raisin. Once it happens, splitting the ear is virtually impossible.
    The cartilage must be COMPLETELY removed in order to use earliners. Leaving it in will make your ears thick as well as highlighting the edges of the liner inside.
     
    tem and HondaXR250 like this.
  15. Dennis Duffy

    Dennis Duffy New Member

    18
    11
    I sure do appreciate all the responses more than you all know! Thank You!
     
    HondaXR250 likes this.