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Bury Or Soak A Boar's Skull?

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by Kelsey Swalwell, Mar 2, 2020.

  1. Bury

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Soak

    5 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    No such thing as "thinning bone". You either damage it or you don't. Some will learn and do a better job, then there are those others. You know, as well as I. :)
     
    msestak likes this.
  2. Thomas remmingberg

    Thomas remmingberg New Member

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    Seeing as though in another thread you said that Ammonia did, in fact, clean your horse skull I see no reason as to why you claim yourself to be so good. Ammonia is a weak based bleach which contradicts your previous statements saying that bleach destroys a skull. With your knowledge of using bleach on skulls and saying that it worked fine after saying that bleach turns a skull to dust, you are yourself spreading false details. You have no reason to be claiming yourself so high and mighty.
     

  3. Gerard P

    Gerard P New Member

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    Sea Wolf
    You are right on the fact that "thinning bone" may not be exactly right. Then again maybe people in different places call things different names. Maybe "thinning bone" means something different where they are from.

    Msestak
    I don't think it's fair to insinuate that just because two people agree on a topic that they are trying to hurt other people. They might just have had different experiences using non-conventional methods to get a nice looking trophy. Just a quick google search for bleached boar skull got me this beauty. At least in my eyes, this looks like quite a well-done skull. 00small13648366.jpeg
     
  4. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    And, if you had actually read that post, you would have read "And dont use bleach as it eats the bone....when done cleaning, immerse in Hydrogen peroxide (Walmart) until white." As well as the owner of the skull who posted, "I degreased in dishwashing liquid and rinse. Then peroxide." No BLEACH was used or recommended by anyone in that post. You are right, it is a well done skull. And it was done correctly.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2020
    msestak likes this.
  5. Kelsey Swalwell

    Kelsey Swalwell New Member

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    Thanks plenty, I’m leaning toward the maceration route. Just read your beaver skull post. My neighbor has a bucket heater I can borrow, can I make that work? It has a ton of warnings in the manual... would it really be okay to leave it on overnight? It’s still freezing at night here, too!
     
  6. Kelsey Swalwell

    Kelsey Swalwell New Member

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    Look, I’m not bleaching the skull. Can anyone please answer my question about using a bucket heater? Can I really leave it in there all day and night? It sure has a lot of fire hazard warnings on it.
     
  7. Chad Houston

    Chad Houston New Member

    Actually "Thomas Remmingberg", It is easier to go in with toilet bowl cleaner, jello, and a lil' bit of fox urine (if u know what i mean ;) and that should fix er right up.
    :)
     
    msestak likes this.
  8. blindluck

    blindluck Active Member

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    Years ago before I knew anything about skull cleaning I used bleach on my first bear skull. I learned real quick how corrosive bleach was as it totally destroyed my skull. Started to flake became very brittle and ultimately fell apart. Since then I have come along way and turned out some pretty nice skulls But still not perfect
     
    msestak likes this.
  9. socalmountainman

    socalmountainman Northwestern School of Taxidermy - Class of '73

    3 1/2 " cutters, 11 3/4 nose to eye, 375 lbs. Wild Boar from Monterey Co. California is known for it's trophy boars. Doing a shoulder mount on it, plus he wanted a Euro skull.
     
    msestak likes this.
  10. pir^2h

    pir^2h Retrievers give you the bird

    I did the skull burial on a black bear once, never again. When I retrieved it about six months later is was stained. After that I started simmering my skulls in sal-soda and then 40 volume hydrogen peroxide. They come out beautifully.
     
    msestak likes this.
  11. 13 point

    13 point Well-Known Member

    That looks lik
    that looks like a javelina skull not a hog , not that it matters . And I’m with most on here bleach will flake and destroy a skull over time
     
    msestak likes this.
  12. HondaXR250

    HondaXR250 Well-Known Member

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    If the bucket heater is the kind that is for keeping livestock water from freezing, it likely wont get hot enough. You need to keep the water around 85F. But youll have to check first and see what temp it gets up to. More than likely leaving it in will be fine. Ive had two buckets heated to 115F for a year, and 1 bucket at 85F. Those warnings are to cover the company incase something happens.
     
    Kelsey Swalwell and msestak like this.
  13. I absolutely second this! NEVER use bleach on a skull. Sure, maybe you will get okay results at first. But then the bone will start flaking and get disgusting. Worse, the bleach does weird things (not very scientific I know) to the massive amounts of fat in boar bones and will likely cause it to start STINKING and rot quickly.
     
    msestak likes this.
  14. Since most of the flesh is already gone, I would recommend macerating. It's a boar skull we are talking about (and they are really fatty!), so you would almost definitely have to soak the skull anyway to degrease. Go ahead and add some dish soap to the macerating water. Be sure to change the water frequently, especially at the beginning of the process. Otherwise all the fat will just re-absorb into the skull.

    Teeth and Tusks: You'll also want to remove as many teeth as you can. Lots of nasty gunk gets built up under the teeth. There is a massive nerve in the tusks too which needs to be removed.

    Once the tusks are out, you can keep them separate from the rest of the skull until it's finished being clean. I fill my tusks with hot glue to keep keep them from cracking/splitting. Maybe not the most "professional" solution but it's cheap and works.
     
    Kelsey Swalwell and msestak like this.
  15. HondaXR250

    HondaXR250 Well-Known Member

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    I dont know if adding dish soap to the macerating water would be a good idea. It would inhibit the enzymes.
     
  16. Yourmom

    Yourmom New Member

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    Well, I usually go with a meat-eating plant, aka a pirana plant, and let it sit a few days with the skull. After a couple of days and very small amounts of work you can have a perfectly done trophy. The pirana plant won't bite into the skull but instead, chomp the meat.
     
  17. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    I see the alchemists are waking up from their winter hibernationso_O..
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2020
    msestak likes this.
  18. Kelsey Swalwell

    Kelsey Swalwell New Member

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    Thank you, friend. I think I'll mostly need to reassure my partner that I'm not going to burn the house down, haha. This one claims it can heat water up to 180F but I'm worried it's defective, water has been tepid at best after 30 min.
     
  19. HondaXR250

    HondaXR250 Well-Known Member

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    Your very welcome. I would do some testing with it first to be sure. And i definitely wouldnt do it in the house! Have you macerated anything yet??
     
    msestak likes this.
  20. msestak

    msestak Well-Known Member

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    i call BS. maybe i am wrong but your user name and the mention of the piranah plant which happens to be a video game cartoon plant, so i call BS :)