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Would Going To A School For Taxidermy Be A Good Investment?

Discussion in 'Training' started by cristomike2, May 7, 2020.

  1. John Stewart

    John Stewart New Member

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    OH I'm not. I looking forward to this new adventure. I was just a bit taken back by some people trying to get him to take an alternative career. But he's a relatively young guy.
     
  2. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    I sorry, but I had to chuckle at Blackboard 29's response. (Now don't go taking it personal. Its NOT directed at you.) A "school" costs you $1200 a week. Multiply that by the number of students. Which one of you taxidermists clears that kind of money the first month of your hunting season?
    I know nothing about this school but I know everything about taxidermists. Few have teaching credentials and even fewer are willing to go into history and alternate methods from the one they're comfortable with. I only heard about Harry Paulson's school in Arizona but knowing Harry, it was likely pretty inclusive. To MY knowledge, our greatest shtick on this side was Ralph and Sandy Garland's school at Piedmont Community College. When it gained popularity, Piedmont wanted a slice and demanded a full academic curriculum be added. As is typical of us, the taxidermy school withered and died.
    So I suppose that if you have this obsessive burning desire and 10 grand to blow, head for a school. As for me, I figure out how many elk, mule deer, and pronghorn hunts I could spend that cash on.
     
    socalmountainman likes this.

  3. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    I said that because I started late in life on this journey as well and have been full time for just about 15 years and I can't imagine doing anything else. It's not easy by any means but well worth it, to me.
     
    ARUsher and Fallenscale like this.
  4. Gatorhog94

    Gatorhog94 New Member

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    Hey John, I’m in the same boat you are. I’m 46 and have 7 years left, wish it was less. Looking at doing the same thing for after retirement. I’m doing skulls right now, but I’m looking at a school to go to next year.
     
  5. Gatorhog94

    Gatorhog94 New Member

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    3bears did you go to a school or did did you go learn somewhere hands on?
     
  6. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    A little of both as well as on my own. Learning from a seasoned, "Good" instructor will put you way ahead in the game. There are all levels of instructors just as there are taxidermists. My suggestion is to look at the work that any perspective teacher puts out on a regular basis and ask yourself, would I have them mount my trophy? If not then why would you want to learn from them? Also ask for references and talk to past students. I see others brag about some instructors and how good they are but then often times they put out subpar work, in my eyes anyway..
     
  7. Gatorhog94

    Gatorhog94 New Member

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    Got it, thanks!
     
    3bears likes this.
  8. School was no option for me as I have a family, full time job and bills.

    I just make sure I follow my state taxidermy association and jump on any workshops they have. Also watch for the state shows where they have a lot of seminars. You would be surprised how much confidence one workshop will make you on trying it on your own.

    Buy DVD's also, did my first squirrel with only a DVD and absolutely no background what so ever.
     
  9. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    I understand that it can be very difficult to go to school and work and have a family. I did it, i was an on site supervisor for a construction company and usually had a crew of 5 to 10 guys, from 6 am to 3 pm and then had an hour to hour and half drive, depending on where my job site was and then was in school til 10 or 11 and then home and do it all over again the next day. I only saw my kids on rain days and weekends. It was tough but thankfully I had a wife that stood by me. I then continued my day job and ran my business at night and weekends but decided that didn't work for me so I made the jump. Walked away from a 25 year career that I somewhat enjoyed, without a pension mind you, and followed my passion.
     

  10. unfortunately where I am in the northeast, we don't have any taxidermy schools available close by. The closes I found was in Pennsylvania (except rick cranes fish course) so commuting everyday was not an option for me, as much as I wish I could have!