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Fleshing Machine Worth The Money?

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by 101stcurrahee, Jun 22, 2020.

  1. 15pt

    15pt Well-Known Member

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    As far as the initial fleshing the pressure washer and turbo nozzle is the best I've used. It gets all the crap off and blood out of the hide. Downside is a pile of mess.
     
  2. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Fallen scale, did you ever see "Quigley Down Under"? The last sequence where he's in a gunfight? Well I'm going to paraphrase his remarks to the guy dying on the ground: "Never said I didn't know how to use one. Said I never much cared for them."

    The beam is an antiquated method that has no more reason to hang around than a Victrola gramophone. You won't find a quality professional tannery in the world using them today. I quit using them about the same time I stopped using macerated skulls, 2x4s and excelsior to make deer forms.
     
    Frank E. Kotula likes this.

  3. Fallenscale

    Fallenscale Well-Known Member

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    Professional tannery dont take in green pelts. If you talking about the leather tannery that a whole another kettle of fish. Round knifes where made to thin not to flesh even though it can over lap the two jobs
     
    Keith likes this.
  4. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Thats not true at all. Carolina Fur has an offshoot business right next door that accepts green frozen capes, fleshes them, a sends the to the tannery. The round knife has long been called a "fleshing machine". Ive fleshed suirreks, foxes, and on a bet, a chipmunk. NOTHING compares with one for boar, moose, and elk. I fleshed dozens of bears with mine and for pronghorn, the wheel is unmatched in cleaning the cheek glands off without tearing or cutting the hide.
     
    Frank E. Kotula likes this.
  5. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member


    I do. When I first heard about using it for fleshing ( thanks George), I thought he was crazy. I didn't want that bloody mess on a table and tool I use to shave "clean" capes from the pickle with. I did try it, however, I really like it.

    For those that DP, or use no pickle "tanning" methods, you can shave the raw skin down to the blue if you wanted to. I have done that too.
     
    Frank E. Kotula likes this.
  6. Fallenscale

    Fallenscale Well-Known Member

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    Here you go smart ass
    15929607935617875494795806753860.jpg
     
  7. 101stcurrahee

    101stcurrahee Member

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    It sounds like I should just get a machine. My last few badger hides came out ok but still a hole or two.


    What I'm taking away from this is that I need to sharped at least one side if not both, and try slicing at an angle down the beam being careful not to go to deep.


    I'm not worried about a machine being messy. I am covered from head to toe in badger grease and blood after fleshing one.
     
  8. Fallenscale

    Fallenscale Well-Known Member

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    If you are tanning and mounting mammals you should have one for thinning the hides.
     
  9. 101stcurrahee

    101stcurrahee Member

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    How does thinning work? I’m guessing the “guards” are set to the thickness of the thinnest part of a hide and the rest is shaved to that?

    I’ve never intentionally thinned a hide
     
  10. Sleepyhollow

    Sleepyhollow New Member

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    Here my 2 cents on this topic. Before I was a taxidermist I was a trapper and still am. I have fleshed thousands of animals with a knife and beam. Now I say flesh not thin there is a difference. If you get a good fleshing knife like a Caribou or stimeyer or a Post and match it to your beam and lean to use properly you'll see the difference. I've found over the years that chilling the the meat and fat makes it easier to push and slice off. I can beam and flesh a whitetail cape in a matter of minutes. Just figure out what suits you and your needs and go with it.
     
    3bears, ARUsher and Fallenscale like this.
  11. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member


    L know people who thin with no guards at all. It is a tactile sensitivity (feel)thing with them.
     
  12. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Speaking of smart asses, what part of "fleshing machine" didn't you comprehend? ANYONE who uses a beam and a knife are just archaic. They're tools of either the destitute or just the ignorant. I do apologize for not knowing how that crew does work simply because I'm a taxidermist, not an upholsterer. I guess since Carolina has a staff of shavers, they don't have to be as particular as real taxidermists.
     
  13. 15pt

    15pt Well-Known Member

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    You would really benefit from the pressure washer!
     
  14. Fallenscale

    Fallenscale Well-Known Member

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    George

    It doesn't bother me you dont use a fleshing knife and beam. It that you couldn't get them to work for you so you say there worthless. That your ignorance. It good that you share what works for you but be intelligent enough to know more pelts have been fleshed on a beam then any other way. There many ways to skin a cat but you go running down a tool that is most used to people that are new you are doing Injustice to them. By the way the round knife flesher was not invented to flesh a hide it was to thin or shave the hide. Yes it works as a flesher as well does a wire wheel and pressure washer with a turbo tip. I have no problem with any of them.
     
    Keith likes this.
  15. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Speaking of intelligence, you must have skipped those classes. You keep implying that I can't use one or didn't use one. I was using one while you were probably in diapers (or worse). It was a necessary tool to accomplish a job back when I started 65 years ago, but SOMEONE (obviously not related to you) was smart enough to come up with a much more efficient and productive way of doing business. I've always thought that I remained marginally successful in business by refusing to get stuck in the past and when new items hit the market, I tried them. Many were hoaxes or simply silly (like the "mini-flesher"), but I still tried them. I'm sorry you're not coordinated or talented enough to use a fleshing machine as it was intended and you're welcome to your choices. It, however, will not prevent me from telling budding taxidermists that there are still antiquated and drudgerous methods out there and that they should join the modern era where you don't inhibit eventual back issues.
     
  16. 15pt

    15pt Well-Known Member

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    The only good advice for a newbie is to find a different career path!
     
    George likes this.
  17. Fallenscale

    Fallenscale Well-Known Member

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    I only used your words what you put in print. Dont worry George I do fine on a round knife I am even smart enough to sharpen it. I was even smart enough to buy one before I even started to try my hand at taxidermy. I'm waiting for your Supreme brain to say they didnt have them yet when you started.
     
  18. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    I assume the MAY have had them in commercial tanners in 1958 but it damned sure wasn't in the Northwestern Taxidery Supply or Van Dykes Supply catalogs. And I have to wonder how you "sharpen" a blade that has to be curled and annealed afterwards. Now i "dressed" my blades until I hit the hard disk, but I never sharpened them. I suspect you have a wild hair growing someplace and just want to carry this defense of antique tools farther. You seem to have exceptional talent by the photos so you need to explain your end game here. Fleshing beams are like hard wire telephones and manual typewriters.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2020
  19. 15pt

    15pt Well-Known Member

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    I personally don't use a knife because I cant. I've never got the hang of it and will cut the armpits out everytime. Got a buddy who's been using same knife for 30 years and is great with it. Other than having to wait on capes to mount I have no idea why I don't send my capes to a tannery. Seminole quoted me a price of $47 a cape. My time and supplies to do one are more than that.
     
  20. 101stcurrahee

    101stcurrahee Member

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    Do they give huge discounts to taxidermists? My old one told me it cost around50/60 bucks a cape for the tannery that’s he uses. I called every tannery around and they all wanted $200+.


    Thanks for the replies. I’m going to get a machine when I can.