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Removing Paint From Skulls

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by SeanSr30, Jun 23, 2020.

  1. SeanSr30

    SeanSr30 Member

    I recently received a few deer skulls from a guy that he had painted white instead of whitening them how he should have. Any tips on removing the paint properly so that I can whiten them the right way?
     
  2. Maybe use acetone/nail polish remover.
     
    SeanSr30 likes this.

  3. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Acetone or paint thinner or even white gas will do it, but let dry completely before adding to peroxide. I just had a similar issue. Pissed me off.
     
    Sleepyhollow and SeanSr30 like this.
  4. SeanSr30

    SeanSr30 Member

    Have you used gas before? I can def try either gas or acetone doesnt matter which one but I have 3 skulls to do this to
     
  5. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Yes but I soaked them in it. An added benefit is that acetone or white gas will also degrease after it softens the paint. Beware, do this outside because both are highly flammable.
     
  6. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    If you go the gas route, make sure it is "White Gas" aka Coleman fuel and a few other names. Make certain it is the right stuff. Do not use auto gasoline! You can also wrap with clean white rags and soak in acetone. Keep them in a covered container so the acetone does not evaporate. Make sure the rags stay wet with acetone and also make sure the container is acetone proof or that will dissolve too. It will have a 2 in the triangle on the bottom. If you can submerge them in acetone it will be better but the antlers require a larger container so you can seal it.

    If you paid someone to clean your skulls and they did this, you can also request that they remove the paint. That is just a hallmark of a quickie, sloppy job. ... unless you were requesting that you wanted them back quickly and they did this to make them presentable for you.
     
  7. SeanSr30

    SeanSr30 Member

    I actually do skulls for people it wasnt something that I sent out at all lol. This guy just didnt want them anymore and I said I would take them but the white paint looks horrible lol. I think I'm going to give the acetone a try as I have plenty of that on hand
     
  8. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Horrible. Yes it does. Especially a couple of years later if there is grease underneath. The acetone will also either remove some grease outright or alter it some so that if you give the skulls a good soak in either hot detergent or ammonia solution a lot of it will be removed. .. If it was boiled in, will take longer and some staining might be permanent.
     
  9. In the past I have used paint stripper (what you would use to strip furniture) to remove paint on skulls. And unless the skull is very delicate or has been degraded by boiling or chlorine bleach, the stripper does not harm the skull. That said, acetone also works, but I've had situations where it didn't do the trick, especially if the paint was very thick. So if the acetone doesn't work you might consider paint stripper.
     
  10. Gatorhog94

    Gatorhog94 New Member

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    Not to hijack the thread, but how can you get stain out of a skull. A small amount got onto the skull (Staining the antlers) after whitening. I’ve tried sanding and small amount of peroxide and even acetone. Nothing seems to get it out.
     
  11. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    I gave up. Staining antlers with 50/50 turp and linseed oil. Never did get any of it out. Fortunately, it was mine and not a customers. Now, I stain all antlers and horns working upside down so the drips hit the floor instead. Just seemed easier than trying to wrap a whole skull in plastic to protect it.