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First Timer, Looking For Ways To Practice

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by Eddiem0nster, Jul 25, 2020.

  1. Eddiem0nster

    Eddiem0nster New Member

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    Hey everyone,

    I've been studying tom sexton's bass skin mount a to z, along with rick krane's painting video. I'm looking for your guidance. I have two fish in the freezer I caught to practice on. One more so for the skinning process and the other to try and do a full mount. The thing that intimidates me the most is definitely the airbrushing skills. New territory for me. If you were in my shoes what advice could you tell me or what is the best approach to get the most practice to increase my skill sets. Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Eddiem0nster

    Eddiem0nster New Member

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    By the way I would like to go IWATA out the gate, I'm visiting a friend tomorrow who paints swimbaits with an Iwata so he's going to give me a crash course.
     

  3. Kerby Ross

    Kerby Ross KSU - Class of '83; U.S. Army - Infantry (83-92)

    When airbrushing ..... go light. Too many beginners and some old timers put the paint on too thick.

    :)

    Kerby...
     
  4. Clew

    Clew Help a child, Build our future

    2,451
    2,878
    York, SC
    Go light like Kirby said you can add you can’t take away
    But let’s get these two in the freezer mounted first
    Bong put the cart before the horse
    Get some good reference for atonomy and paint reference
    Study in depth the colors in depth
    Each scale
    Look at head alignment
    Fin alignment
    Position of the mouth
    Best advice is study your subject
     
  5. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    Print some black and white pic on paper of different species of fish. Learn how your airbrush works on spots, vermiculations and broad spraying. I say paper cause you can just throw them away and once you feel confident with that , get a reproduction. Now study references real close. Look at scale details. Break down your references more and try to recreate that. Once you feel real comfortable doing that, paint your fish.
    The biggest issue with airbrush work is learning what your brush can and cannot do.
    If your getting an Iwata and if it’s a top of the line ( 2mm tip) dont ever spray and kind of pearlescent or metallic paint through it. The flakes will destroy the tip and your detail work will hurt. Besides those nozzles are like $30.00 .
    I will also add , spend the money to have on hand : extra nozzle, needle, O ring or packing screw replacement. Cause if you drop it more than likely your tip is shot. If it’s bent, DONT PULL IT OUT. It’ll only ruin the nozzle. Cut it or grind it off, then pull it out. Save yourself some bucks.
    Also you can remove the cone on the Iwata ( you might buy one too cause if you drop it , gremlins take it and you’ll never find it lol) so that you can get even finer sharper lines
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2020
    Eddiem0nster likes this.
  6. Eddiem0nster

    Eddiem0nster New Member

    25
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    Would you happen to know a Shaye Clayton in Smyrna?
     
  7. Eddiem0nster

    Eddiem0nster New Member

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    Just what I'm looking for. This is very helpful, thank you. I visited my friend today who paints swimbaits and he has a couple of blanks he's going to let me practice on. He showed me how to retard the paint to a milky substance on his HP-CS and just the basics, lines, dots.

    I'm going to the local art shop tomorrow to try and find an HP-BS. I'll double up on the supplies you mentioned.
     
    Frank E. Kotula likes this.
  8. How about that screw that holds the needle ,can't see it ,how is that even made
     
  9. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    That’s where the O ring is or packing screw lol
    Yep made a screwdriver for that one lol
     
  10. Eddiem0nster

    Eddiem0nster New Member

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    I've been doing some digging on the waterbased vs lacquer. Rick Krane is using lacquer-based paint on his video. Since I'm using his video as a reference I really want to use exactly what he is showing since I'm a newbie. If I don't I would then have the dilemma of color matching, etc. I have the garage that I'll be starting in, food for thought I'm hoping to move to Alaska if I land a job there and they can't get lacquer anymore unless I stock up and drive with it. The water-based approach seems "healthier" but the veteran guys seem to swear by lacquer and the lack of problems with it. I tried to dig and look into many threads on the subject but I'm kind of stumped with using Rick Krane as my teaching source, otherwise, I would no doubt try WB.
     
  11. fishmaster

    fishmaster Well-Known Member

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    When you or someone you know goes fishing and fillets some fish, save the skins off the sides. Throw them in a bucket of water to get the slime off and scrape off any remaining meat or tissue on the back. Glue the skins, (five or ten of them would be perfect), to a piece of styrofoam or even a piece of plywood. Staple or pin the edges to hold them flat until the glue dries. When dry after a few days you have all the test samples you want to try different painting techniques. Try this method with different species to hone your skills without spending the time to mount a fish every time. You can wipe off the paint with lacquer thinner and start over. It's much better to have scales and texture to paint over than a flat surface.
    There is no shortcut for practice.
     
    Eddiem0nster and ARUsher like this.
  12. ARUsher

    ARUsher Active Member

    This advice really makes sense. Thanks for posting!
     
    Eddiem0nster likes this.
  13. Didn't know Rick was using lacquer paints ,thought he was a water guy ,watch Matuska on face book they show how to use createx a great water based paint
     
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  14. Eddiem0nster

    Eddiem0nster New Member

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    He's using lifetones on his video, looking at the lifetones brand it says it's lacquer based. I'll give it a look thanks.
     
  15. Yes life tone is water ,polytranspar is lacquer or water
     
  16. Eddiem0nster

    Eddiem0nster New Member

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    On mckenzie it says it's lacquer based? I'm confused now
     
  17. Yes your right sorry I'm wrong,in the WASCO catalog they sell life tone lacquer and water ,my confusion
     
    Eddiem0nster likes this.
  18. Eddiem0nster

    Eddiem0nster New Member

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    no worries, just trying to figure this all out
     
  19. It's a tough thing to learn for sure,
     
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