1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Cape Buffalo Help

Discussion in 'Tutorials' started by bigbear 669, Aug 4, 2020.

  1. bigbear 669

    bigbear 669 Member

    81
    1
    Anybody do a tutorial on mounting and finishing a Cape buffalo that they would be willing to share ? PM me.
    Thanks
     
  2. crablover

    crablover Well-Known Member

    399
    896
    Bigbear, can you be more specific as to what part of the process would best help you. There is no doubt, that you will be tasked with some unique issues: ie maintaining loose looking skin, rebuilding soft pedicule p buff.jpg roperly and most of all the final finishing and coloring. These are just a couple of things you will have to deal with. Glad to help if you could be more specific Cape Buffalo.jpg Cape Buffalo.jpg Buff 2.jpg
     

  3. Dwight Corle

    Dwight Corle New Member

    3
    0
    Hello Crablover,

    I too would l love to have more information regarding mounting a cape buffalo. I shot a nice bull last year in South Africa and just got it here to the states am looking for any helpful tips I can get since this will be my first Cape Buffalo mounting experience. My questions primarily involve how to best build back up the bosses where the boiling process eroded some away. and then the finish painting and coloring of the hide etc. Also how to best treat the horns, both color wise and any special treatment you did to make them look so natura. I would be honored to find out how you made the bull in these pictures looks so natural and realistic, Beautiful Mount!!

    Thanks,

    Dwight
     
  4. crablover

    crablover Well-Known Member

    399
    896
    • Dwight, I fill the horns with foam then scrub the heck out of them with TSP, multiple times then let dry well. I use laytex caulk ( black) as a filler, then epoxy clay over that to detail and replace the soft pedicle around the horn base. When the finishing of the mount starts, recolor and blend the horn base. The mud is yellow dextrin tinted with tempera paint. I then dust with the saw dust of MDF board as well as the skin and spay with matt lacquer.
    • As for hide coloring, there are a few different ways to do that. For me it is dependent on the amount of epidural color loss of the tanned cape. I like to dye the cape from the backside. Some choices for that are Flank Dye Powder, Liquid Shoe Polish, Potassium Permanganate and paint. Hope this helps
     
  5. Dwight Corle

    Dwight Corle New Member

    3
    0
    Thank you very much for the information!! How exactly do you fill the horns with foam and what foam do you use? I would guess you would have to drill holes in them and inject the foam?
     
  6. crablover

    crablover Well-Known Member

    399
    896
    Dwight, you should notice that the bone core under the horn shell is not solid, but filled with voids, pockets and channels much like swiss cheese or an ocean sponge. This causes field processors to over boil the skull and horn. It is also required for export that all animal parts be acid dipped , hence the multiple scrubbing with TSP to remove residual grease and organic material. Once dry, you can drill small holes if needed to insert the tube end of window and door foam to fill all the voids. I use Great Stuff brand for this. You could also use 2 lb pour in foam and fill from the horn base opening. Either method will fill all internal voids, bond the skull and horn as well as eliminate any issues with insects. Hope this helps and good luck
     
  7. Dwight Corle

    Dwight Corle New Member

    3
    0
    Thank you!! Great information and I will follow it!!
     
  8. Western Wildlife Art Studio

    Western Wildlife Art Studio STUDIO PHONE (406) 356-2100

    MARKING
     
  9. Gray Ghost Safaris

    Gray Ghost Safaris Hunting Consultant

    Those that hunt Cape Buffalo and plan to mount their own bull (or cow) should take notes and measurements when the buffalo is on the ground. Aside from that, try to avoid shooting young bulls. If your not familiar with Cape Buffalo, I highly suggest doing some research. Far too many times a PH will tell his client to shoot a bull that is still soft (boss).That said, you may be paying for discount hunts/bulls that are not mature (to get a deal) and sometimes that can depend upon where your hunting; South Africa vs Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Uganda etc. By taking accurate measurements where hard horn stops and soft begins, you will know how much to re-create when your mounting your own buffalo. Don't forget to estimate shrinkage due to boiling and drying over time. crablover is giving good advice on filling the void. I might add, use blue painters tape on the just below the bosses to keep the foam from expanding on the skull. The brand crablover recommends is excellent, as the window & door foam doesn't expand like the original Great Stuff (tan foam). The window/door version doesn't build as much pressure but expect it to exit the horns quite a bit. The tape can capture any overfill.
     
  10. crablover

    crablover Well-Known Member

    399
    896
    Thanks Grey Ghost! I have been very fortunate to have mounted many Buff's in my 45 years doing this and you could not have been more accurate in choosing the right animal for your trophy. It is critical that horn preparation, filling, setting and finishing is accurately done to not interfere with ear and eye accuracy. Rebuilding the soft pedicle correctly is very important. The boiling process causes the semi hard horn to curl, chip and distort and that needs to be stabilized in order to re build the now gone soft pedicle. It should also be noted that there is a color difference of the pedicle in relation to the horn and skin
     
  11. Rob43

    Rob43 Member

    All great tips. My buddy shot a buffalo in S.A. this year, and I will be mounting it for him. This will be my first ever Cape Buffalo. I did buy a CD from Breakthrough, World Show Cape Buffalo Mounting. I haven't watched it yet, so I'm not sure how informative it is, but I will definitely be using these tips. Thanks.