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"bondo Ears"

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Dingo.303, Sep 1, 2020.

  1. Dingo.303

    Dingo.303 New Member

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    So, im back with a Question or two for you gurus!

    ive recently heard about "bondo" for the Ears........... wow.

    because these deer are my own heads , i dont mind them having a few mm thicker ears than in real life.... so im looking at this method of using the filler to set the ears.........

    cartlidge in or out ? in is much easier...

    Also how would be a more reliable method of applying the thick liquid into the tip of ear first via a hose or funnel and some pressure from behind, leaving alot less mess at the ear butt section?

    i thought a large syringe of 300 ml with a large diameter hose?

    perhaps a cake decorating bag with nozzle?


    an can you lend me any thoughts on pro an cons as to why not use a polyster filler for ears?

    thanks alot! always good to hear from those with experience
     
  2. Dingo.303

    Dingo.303 New Member

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    Now i have searched an found Bondo V liner thread. would like to know about a tool to use tho to apply.
    thanks
     

  3. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    Leave the cartilage in the ear. I buy "Members Mark" paper plates from SamsClub that are relatively thick. I take a stack of them about an inch thick, and cut the fluted edge off them on a bandsaw and keep the round center. I mix bondo on this flat round piece. I use about a Tablespoon of bondo, with a teaspoon of fiberglass resin, and sprinkle with fiberglass chop and about a 1 1/2" line of cream hardener. After mixing with a tongue depressor, I roll it into a funnel, insert into the ear, and begin rolling from the large end until I can express all the filler from the cone. There is about 5 minutes of working time with each ear. Check the butt to make sure that it is coated. I often take the tongue depressor and scrape the remaining product off the plate and paste it on the butt. After it begins to set, roll the ear back about an inch. This layer needs to me open so that clay can be inserted and blended into the ear butt.
     
    John C and Dingo.303 like this.
  4. Dingo.303

    Dingo.303 New Member

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    appreciate that mate.
    i have also added some fibreglass strands to the 'filler', the test i dd with the filler wasnt as brittle as i expected? but i figured some more fibreglass strands through it would not hurt- im yet to test the strength of that mixture but im happy enough to try it on this particular deer of mine.

    il touch back tonight.
    cheers joey
     
  5. 13 point

    13 point Well-Known Member

    Just but the fiberglass hair premixed , turn ears to there edges , soak ears in lacquer thinner to clean , blow dry . Now take a 4-5 inch sewing needle poke a hole in tip of ear to let trapped air out , roll ear down some and put putty in , push and shape to ear pushing air out the tip . Just as it starts to kick incircle earbutt with it put a paper towel on butt turn back out and shape again and pinch edges to thin as it kicks . Very easy.
     
  6. Dingo.303

    Dingo.303 New Member

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    ok so im complete on the mount with the bondo ears.... bondo ears was pretty cool!!

    i used some fibres frm muffler packing and added to the mix...

    forgot to pin the hole until later LOL the air bubble made aware.

    my test with the filler an fibre and without wa good, im happy for strength for a wall hanger mount.

    only first real go so was anxious with the bondo ears prior to mounting, made for a stressful day, it was my first mount of the larger species.... very thick hide etc.

    will post a photo later. an of the ears.

    Thanks ALL
     
  7. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    What I found was that Bondo/chopped fiberglass made for a good strong ear liner and the fiberglass resin helped with adhesion. Now, Bondo was made for the auto body field as a filler. There is nothing in that industry where it is used to adhere two pieces of anything together. Because of this, you may experience drumming. Drumming happens with glue and even epoxy if not done correctly. Usually though, a drummed ear 6 to 10 feet off the floor on the wall is very difficult to detect, especially if the inner ear hair is long.
     
  8. Dingo.303

    Dingo.303 New Member

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    hey Tangles, thanks for that, i am aware of the lack of bond with the two sides thogh! bit of a bugger!
    as you said, from a few feet up, an away, no real drama !? will keep an eye on it.

    heres some pics

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