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3-d Printing In The Taxidermy Industry

Discussion in 'Molding and Casting' started by jake7719, Oct 15, 2020.

  1. jake7719

    jake7719 Well-Known Member

     
  2. jake7719

    jake7719 Well-Known Member

    3-D printing is moving fast into the home, crafting, small shops of all type. Just with the introduction of foam manikins and the air brush to taxidermy changed the industry. The fleshing machine, super glue, and casting and molding agents, safety acid, all in my life time.
     

  3. Mudbat

    Mudbat Well-Known Member

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    Ive scanned files for and operated a 3d printer. Unless your spending 10s of thousands on a printer alone the finished product is in no way smooth( covered in small steps) out of the printer, and lacks the ability to print very fin details that a mold would pick up. Would take a whole lot of taxidermy work to come close to the initial start up cost.
     
  4. AZ~Rich

    AZ~Rich " Africa" never fails to satisfy

    I have a really heavy racked elk which a good client brought to me that has a fair amount or horn broken off during the rut. He wanted me to rebuild it all which I could do traditionally but told him that work is additional at $25/inch. He wants a euro first then if it mets his standards after the horn rebuilding then he wants it mounted. Estimating about 85” needed, I quoted him $2125. As I expected he is now pulling back and I think he will be looking for a cheaper option for rebuilding. I was curious what you all think about using 3D printing to make up the missing broken tines and whale tail parts which could be mated and bonded/blended to existing antler. I usually use embedded stout threaded steel rod as the center support on which to build out from. 3D might be something I can suggest to him to explore. Thx for your input. Rich
     

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    Robert Baker likes this.
  5. Robert Baker

    Robert Baker Well-Known Member

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    When I began reading your post I immediately realized where you were going with it. I do a lot of 3D printing/mesh making/3D scanning and even though I don't believe 3D printing has a ton of use in taxidermy from a printing time factor alone -- I think you might be on to something. If you had a side to copy, it would be much easier to scan the tine to copy and print a duplicate for the other side but considering the simplicity of the object you want to produce -- originating the object in blender or another program wouldn't be terribly time consuming either. The finished product would result in a lightweight replacement as well. Wood based filaments will take stain by the way. Nice idea -- I might have to try it myself.

    Robert
     
  6. Clew

    Clew Help a child, Build our future

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    York, SC
    Your wasting time concidering 3D printing
    Scan image, the resolution sucks
    Then you still have to attach
    Make a silicon mold of one of the other points that match
    Slide mold over area to be repaired slit open top of point and pour with a breather tube in mold
    I would pre drill top of repair and insert a rod
     
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  7. Robert Baker

    Robert Baker Well-Known Member

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    Not sure what you're referring to on which resolution sucks? The scanned image or the printed one? If its the scan -- what kind of scanner are you using? If its the print, what print size or quality are you using? My printer can do 0.05mm printed resolution which produces very nice quality. After reading your alternative method however, 3D printing can not beat the old tried and tested mould way of doing it. (I did not know your mould method beforehand lol).. Thank you for the tip Clew.

    Robert
     
  8. Clew

    Clew Help a child, Build our future

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    York, SC
    We have a couple of printers at the plant
    1 plastics
    1 powder metal
    Not cheap ones
    100k + ea
    Printing is moving toward high temp steels in power turbines
    Jet engines ect, the materials run around $70-150 per lb
    This is where these printers are useful
     
    Robert Baker likes this.