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Making Bird Forms

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by El Pato Loco, Jan 29, 2021.

  1. El Pato Loco

    El Pato Loco New Member

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    I mount quite a few sandhill cranes for use as decoys for my personal use (legal species to hunt in Texas). I purchase commercial forms and cut them. None of them will work without extensive carving for regular mounts or how I heavily modify them to work with my metal bases.

    I am looking at trying to learn to pour my own foam or cast them. How would I go bout building a mould from my carved up body?

    Some years I make 20, some none. Always mount a few for friends for thier homes that they bring to me. I am an amateur, but do hold the federal permit.

    I am tired of buying bodies as I cast my own heads....etc..

    Thanks for any help.

    P.S. I am allergic to fiberglass, but ill brave it if its the only way.
     
  2. El Pato Loco

    El Pato Loco New Member

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    I searched and found my nearly exact post from a year ago. There was a link there to make bodies, but I just bought commercial ones after looking at it. Not going to purchase any more.
     

  3. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Trace and carve your own, as decoys, way lighter than bought forms.
     
  4. El Pato Loco

    El Pato Loco New Member

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    Not sure my wording is coming across correctly. I need bird forms. I Weld light weight EMT to plate steel. Cut forms. Insert plate and pipe. Foam over and then mount bird.

    Id like a way to pour my own instead of purchasing forms, cutting them down, etc. It would be nice to alter 1 form and then pour them myself, instead of cutting every one of them down. I looked over some made by another taxidermist and altered my design to make them durable on stakes.

    Carving each would not save me any time. I already basically am doing that but with store bought forms.


    [​IMG]
     
  5. El Pato Loco

    El Pato Loco New Member

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    My design is sound. Just tired of cutting perfectly good forms down 1 at a time to make what I need. Covered my uglymug



    [​IMG]
     
  6. El Pato Loco

    El Pato Loco New Member

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    Here is a pic of a form of a goose my young nephew was helping me prepare. You can see where I basically cut it in half to do what I do and then foam back over. It would be waaayyy easier to cast a copy of my prepared form.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    Trace carve and make a master mold and then pour as many as you need from that. Save one good pour to remake mold when it wears out.
     
  8. El Pato Loco

    El Pato Loco New Member

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    Yes Sir. What and how would I make the mould? Plaster of Paris?????
     
  9. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    I'd probably use reinforced fiberglass so that I could get many casts out of it before it starts to wear out. There is vidoes on line that show the process, I think there is even some tutorials here.
     
  10. Kostyniuk-outdoors

    Kostyniuk-outdoors Alberta free and proud

    Id use fiberglass to make a mold. use sand as a base when making first half and make sure to make "keys" imprints in the sand around edge. flip over make second half. boom ready to mass produce.
     
  11. D265

    D265 New Member

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    I've done some looking around and it's hard to find any quality videos of this process. I'm sure the supply companies hate them. Could you post a link?
     
  12. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    sorry no I don't but I'm certain there is some in the tutorials here or even the fish section.
     
  13. Clew

    Clew Help a child, Build our future

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    Carve the body that suits your needs
    Then make the mold using high fiber and fiberglass
    With fiber glass Matt
     
    Frank E. Kotula likes this.