1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

European Skull Grey

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by ATCTaxidermy, Feb 1, 2021.

  1. ATCTaxidermy

    ATCTaxidermy New Member

    5
    0
    ***pictures included**
    Why is my skull this color? I’ve boiled and bleached and it’s still this grey color! Why? Is this fixable?
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 12, 2021
  2. ATCTaxidermy

    ATCTaxidermy New Member

    5
    0
    Anybody??
     

  3. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,216
    2,077
    MN
    Put this in skull section and hold on for a little ass chewing. Never boil, unless you are making soup. It weakens bone and pushes grease deeper into the bone. What did you use to whiten?
     
  4. ATCTaxidermy

    ATCTaxidermy New Member

    5
    0
    Well nobody likes an ass chewing. ‍♀️ I feel like I’ve been mislead, I always boil my skulls. I live in a colder climate where winters are long so maceration isn’t really my favorite way to “clean” my skulls. I’d hate for my customers to wait 6+ months on a euro mount. Anyway, I bleached in Super White powder and 40 volume cream developer. Do you suggest this is grease in the skull?
     
  5. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,216
    2,077
    MN
    I'm in MN and I macerate all skulls, it takes a week to two to get em clean and then a month in the degreaser. My customers will wait 6 months to get a properly cleaned degreased skull back. Yes it is grease that has been cooked, burnt into the bone. The pic showing how deviated the septum is, helps to point to my conclusion.
     
    ATCTaxidermy likes this.
  6. Tnrandy

    Tnrandy Active Member

    126
    78
    Looks like grease. If you want to macerate, get an old deep freezer and use a light bulb on a thermostat to regulate your temps. You can clean a skull in 5-6 days if it's skinned and trimmed. I can provide more info if interested.
    As for your skull, I'd try to put it in heated ammonia for a week and see if it's any better. might also want to try soaking it in liquid peroxide like baquacil or similar.
     
    ATCTaxidermy likes this.
  7. Use inferior methods, get inferior results.

    Lots of folks started out boiling and some still do. But as you can see, boiling will not always give you satisfactory results even if you are not concerned about destroying the fine detail nasal bones. And just because it might look OK to you when you first get it done, does not mean it will continue to look OK a year or two down the road.

    A boiled head like you have is a lot more difficult to degrease than one that has not been simmered or boiled.

    If your process is not producing good results consistently that you are happy with, this site has lots of info that can be used to improve your results.

    Good luck with the grease removal on this one but do not expect it to be a quick process.
     
    ATCTaxidermy likes this.
  8. Great Skulls

    Great Skulls Active Member

    482
    139
    Yup. You cooked the blood in there. Might be grease, but I think it's blood. Also, boiling might have removed some collagen, making the skull flaky and even more translucent - making it easier to see whatever you cooked in there.

    No easy way to fix it now. You might be able to drill into those areas and soak with dawn water or ammonia. No more whitening. The bone is as white as it will get - you just need to get that stain. I'll bet it won't come out any more than that, but if you work hard you might get it a bit better.
     
    ATCTaxidermy likes this.
  9. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Would say that it blood that you cooked into it. Don't let anyone tell you you can't macerate in the winter. It takes 2 weeks to clean a skull even in single digit temperatures. Bone is also now compromised by boiling so don't cook it any more. You can try soaking in a solution of Iron Out to get the stains but don't bet on it.

    As others have stated, boil if you want to ruin something or crank out stuff fast that might be passable at first, make the customer happy and then have that customer bad mouthing your work to everyone when it looks like crap in a year or two (or less). Maceration takes 2 weeks, 365 days out of the year. Maybe another month or so to get the grease out and sometimes longer depending on the species of critter. A day to whiten. All my customers sign a contract that tells them it can take 3 months or more to return their skull to them. Most have no issue with it because they know what they get back is first class quality. Maceration never takes 6 months. If it's taking you a month to clean a skull in the winter by that method you certainly are not doing it right.
     
    Elkarcher and ATCTaxidermy like this.
  10. ATCTaxidermy

    ATCTaxidermy New Member

    5
    0
    Th
    Thank you for your input. I would absolutely appreciate more info on any methods you’d like to share!
     
  11. ATCTaxidermy

    ATCTaxidermy New Member

    5
    0
    T
     
  12. Tnrandy

    Tnrandy Active Member

    126
    78
    I'm in TN, the temps get down in the teens at night during the winter...I have an old deep freezer that I heat with a heat bulb on an inkbird thermostat to regulate the temp around 100 degrees. We mainly do whitetail, we place the skulls, well trimmed, eyes and brain removed, in 5 gallon buckets of water and put them in the freezer. The bulb will heat the water in the buckets and usually can have a cleaned skull in 5-7 days.

    Maceration is stinky so be prepared for that!
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    There are years worth on free info on this site going all the way back to 2006. Use the Search feature, take the time to tweak it, and you will find there is a ton of free info, including pictures, on making all manner of maceration set ups. Don't let anyone tell you to just chuck it into water and let it sit. It's wrong. You have to heat it 24/7 for it to work properly. How you provide that heat and the containers you use are many and varied.