1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Making Painted Spots On A Northern Look More Natural?

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by Cecil, Mar 18, 2021.

  1. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    Anybody have any suggestions for blending in spots on a northern pike so the white does not stand out as much and look painted?

    I recently assembled a bare bones replica that instead of gel coated in white was bondo colored. Horrible cast, but was all I could get in that size. Wow I had to grind out the head and make the back of the mouth etc etc.! Never again! Didn't expect it to be that basic and bondo colored as it was a reputable replica supplier. To their credit the supplier did tell me it would need extra work.


    Normally I make spots on a gel coated northern replica by using a q-tip to take paint off after painting the other colors for a more natural look. This one I painted white and sealed, but the q-tip took some of the white off anyway, and I ended up painting the spots with an off-white. I know, I know, I should have gel coated it or mixed some other colors of paint in with the white. So other than starting over, does any have any ideas to knock own the vivid white?
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2021
    msestak likes this.
  2. wildfire taxidermy

    wildfire taxidermy New Member

    4
    3
    Try a misting of scale detail black or dark brown. Thin the paint down and use just enough to tint almost fog it on.
     

  3. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    Bingo! Before I read your post I misted the spots with a very fine mist of dark brown. So fine you can't actually see the brown. Great minds think alike! Did the trick! Glossed it, and will do the job.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2021
    msestak likes this.
  4. WLELTD

    WLELTD Active Member

    746
    126
    I go over them with interference gold powder it nocks down the white and at least what I see they are a light gold
     
  5. Mudbat

    Mudbat Well-Known Member

    727
    1,354
    Do you use water base or lacquer paint?
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2021
    Cecil likes this.
  6. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    I use exclusively lacquer.
     
  7. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    I did also use a gold pearl but didn't see much difference.
     
  8. Mudbat

    Mudbat Well-Known Member

    727
    1,354
    I use both. Was going to say you can remove water base with DA if you lock down the color underneath with lacquer based gloss. It won’t eat into it
     
    Cecil likes this.
  9. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,253
    2,129
    MN
    I use pure white and then mist over the sides with medium transparent green very lightly over the side starting from the back and fading down, but careful it is a bleeder.
     
    jigginjim and Cecil like this.
  10. jigginjim

    jigginjim Active Member

    How about a clear coat over the other colors to reduce the bleed of colors?
     
    Cecil likes this.
  11. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

    8,890
    4,120
    mist over white with yellow
     
  12. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,253
    2,129
    MN
    It doesn't achieve the same results if you seal them first been there done it.
     
  13. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,253
    2,129
    MN
    yes, I do often mist yellows and shades of brown as well to mute the sharpness of the beans, depending on what "Look" I'm shooting for.
     
  14. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

    8,890
    4,120
    Tom Witbeck had a method of painting the spot then painting a smaller spot inside it one with off white one with pearl white cant remember which
     
    Cecil likes this.
  15. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    Been there done that. Comes out too greenish for my taste albeit I have used yellow ochre for northerns that have yellowish spots.