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Wiring Wings On Small Birds (starlings, Doves, Quail Etc)

Discussion in 'Bird Taxidermy' started by Sarahartworks, Jan 28, 2022.

  1. Sarahartworks

    Sarahartworks New Member

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    Idaho
    I'm just starting out and recently mounted a California quail and Starling as my first birds. I was able to wire the feet for both successfully, but for some reason I haven't yet gotten the hang of wiring wings. Even though both are standing mounts with closed wings, I still wanted to be able to technique of wiring them for future flying mounts.

    I have a major problem when it comes to wiring them past the ulna/radius to the tip where the bone ends. And I often end up poking through the skin! I have seen some taxidermists purposefully poke it through, and I've seen some that just keep going until there is resistance and stop. Or some poke the wire though the actual bone. Should I just not push too far and just tie and glue the wire really well to the humerus so it doesn't slip around or poke forward?

    I think for my next mount, which is a Eurasian dove I recently shot, I will attempt to pin the wings as I'm planning on having a closed wing mount, and also it's something I haven't tried yet. But for future reference, is there any good resources about wiring wings? Like a good picture where the wire should end in the wing. Or if you have any tips and tricks to help, I'd very much appreciate it! :)
     
  2. Jim McNamara

    Jim McNamara Well-Known Member

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    Any of those work really. If I intend to wire a wing for a standing bird I usually insert the wire into the phalanges or digit area. If it pokes thru no biggie but I try to keep the wire inside that area of bone . Not inside the bone but along side it. This allows me to partially open the wing tip if desired or close it without pinning. I usually just stop at the end of the radius and use black tape to secure it along the radius and humerus. some insist you need to wire the wing on standing birds but I have never had a problem with not doing so. To each his own. Try different ways and find your comfort zone.
    good luck with the dove!!
     
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  3. GotHonks

    GotHonks Well-Known Member

    One thing , starting out ... you might wanna try something bigger like a duck or Pheasant .. I dont even mount those small birds to friking hard for me to skin let alone mount ..
     
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  4. Dave York

    Dave York Well-Known Member

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    Avoid the dove! A lowly mud hen is a good bird to practice on. Chickens are also good.
     
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  5. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Eurasian doves are easier to mount than mourning doves. Their feathers stay rooted better.
     
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  6. Sarahartworks

    Sarahartworks New Member

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    Idaho
    Thanks! Found this super helpful! :)
     
  7. Sarahartworks

    Sarahartworks New Member

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    Idaho
    Thanks for all the replies! I would love to do some bigger birds like ducks and pheasants, but currently I'm only able to get my hands on birds in my backyard. There are tons of them in my area, and they don't take much material to mount. Also they have been still quite valuable in teaching me how to skin/make forms, and wiring (even though it's quite challenging lol). I'm gonna start making connections to people in my area, in fact my dad has met some people who are into duck hunting, so hopefully I'll get to try out a duck soon! In the meantime though, it's gonna be small birds
     
  8. Sarahartworks

    Sarahartworks New Member

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    Idaho
    Not looking for critique, cause I know they are bad haha. Just sharing some pics of them. Here's a pic of my first starling, which is my second bird done ever. Not perfect by any means, but it's an improvement compared to the quail which is my first taxidermy mount. The quail turned out kinda sad, especially the wing area, as the wiring process got me super stumped the first time. 20220129_162127.jpg
    20220129_162207.jpg
     
  9. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Kulis castaway has a DVD that show you how to mount starlings.
     
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  10. Jim McNamara

    Jim McNamara Well-Known Member

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    Sarah your birds look a little tight as in too big a body. Also the necks are too straight . No s curve in them or neck is too long. Next bird before skinning look at the anatomy and see how everything works. An old trick, get a bird that's readily available and pluck it and see what it looks like. Check out the neck action and how it connects to the body in various poses. How the head is attached and works in said poses. I think you get the drift. Wings and legs and even the tail. " There are very
    Generous people on here who might be willing to gift you birds too. Bob Jungman is one of the most generous for waterfowl and a super nice guy too!!!
    Give him a call. I have some videos you might like. Send me a message .
    Jim
     
  11. Dave York

    Dave York Well-Known Member

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    Be aware about what are legal and illegal. Song birds and any bird of prey are illegal to posses.
     
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  12. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Your starlings and eurasian doves are invasive species and legal to kill without permits or bag limits.
     
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