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Whitetail Skull

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by hwkdrvr82, May 13, 2022.

  1. hwkdrvr82

    hwkdrvr82 New Member

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    We run through about 100 WT heads a season using beetles and every so often one shows up like this. Multiple rounds of de-greasing (dawn soap) and whitening (both powder and liquid peroxide) and still can't seem to work out the area noted around the eyes. Any suggestions and help is truly appreciated. image_67148545.JPG
     
  2. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    2,284
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    That isn't degreased, that one just needs more time in heated water soap and maybe ammonia. If I have stubborn skulls I will alternate between acetone and soap and water soak.
     

  3. you need to use ammonia to degrease that.
     
  4. hwkdrvr82

    hwkdrvr82 New Member

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    Is there any certain mixture of ammonia to dawn/water that works best? Should we alternate between room temp then back to our tank heated to 110 to 120?
     
  5. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    120 degrees is the only temp to use with cervids. 110 isn't going to do much of anything. Room temp should only be used with ammonia or acetone. Try adding a healthy shot of ammonia to your degreasing solution. 4 cups in a 5 gallon measure is a good start. It's going to take more time. Soaking in acetone might also give it a kick so your normal degreasing will get a better chance to move it out. I sometimes have an issue like this with fatty bears. This is part of the sinus area which is hard to get at. I haven't tried with deer, but with bears, I take a very long, thin drill and drill holes into that area from inside the brain case. They can't be seen and allow the degreasing solution to move more efficiently through that area.
     
  6. joeym

    joeym Old Murphey

    Maceration in this southern heat will clean it up pronto. I use black cattle feed tubs. Fill with water, cover, and let nature take over. Those lipolytic bacteria will metabolize that fat in two to three weeks. The water temp probably exceeds 120 during the day, but cools at night.